School of Education News

Tue
Jan
29
The latest Under the Law column for Kappan magazine from UW-Madison's Julie Underwood takes a look at segregation in the education system. Underwood is the Susan Engeleiter Professor of Education Law, Policy, and Practice, and the former dean of the School of Education. Underwood begins by writing: "The U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark anti-discrimination case, Brown v. Board of Education (1954), offered the hope of equity and access for all children. Unfortunately, what started as a strong judicial statement lost its steam and left schools to try to make good on these promises in a changing legal environment."
Mon
Jan
28
Ten faculty members from across the UW-Madison campus have been chosen to receive 2019 Distinguished Teaching Awards — including the School of Education’s Bianca Baldridge, an assistant professor with the Department of Educational Policy Studies. UW-Madison’s Distinguished Teaching Awards are an honor given out since 1953 to recognize the university’s finest educators. This is the second major honor for Baldridge in the past couple weeks, as earlier this month she learned she would be receiving an Outstanding Women of Color award from the university.
Mon
Jan
28
An essay from UW-Madison’s Kathryn Moeller that examines one of the most powerful statistics on girls and women in the world — and how it creates racialized stories and distorted development interventions — was published by The New Yorker earlier this month. Moeller is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies and the author of the 2018 book, “The Gender Effect: Capitalism, Feminism, and the Corporate Politics of Development.”
Mon
Jan
28
UW-Madison’s Brett Nachman is the lead author on a new research paper that explains how community college websites often omit depictions of autism — or may even portray it in a medicalized, negative or dehumanizing light. The article appears in the Community College Journal of Research and Practice, and is titled, “Omission and Othering: Constructing Autism on Community College Websites.” Nachman explains that this work is especially important to him as someone with Asperger’s and who attended community college. The report is co-authored with Kirsten Brown, a research faculty member with Edgewood College’s educational leadership doctoral program.
Sun
Jan
27
UW-Madison’s Tandem Press is presenting a new exhibit, “Alison Saar: Printmaker,” at the Tandem Press Apex Gallery. This exhibit, which runs Feb. 1 through April 6, features a selection of limited edition fine art prints created at Tandem Press by Los Angeles-based sculptor and printmaker Alison Saar. Saar’s sculptures, assemblages and prints meditate on a range of experiences related to the African diaspora as well as her personal encounters with racism, sexism and ageism.There will be an opening reception on Feb. 1 from 5 to 7 p.m.
Sat
Jan
26
The annual UW-Madison Education Research Poster Fair is seeking proposals that spotlight education research across campus. These proposals may address research findings related to pre-k through adult education. The fair, which is co-sponsored by the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning and the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), will take place on Feb. 22 from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery.
Fri
Jan
25
UW-Madison School of Education Dean Diana Hess is co-chairing a task force that’s designed to help identify how University of Wisconsin System institutions can better meet Wisconsin’s need for more teachers and school leaders. Hess is co-chairing this group with Deborah Kerr, president-elect of AASA, the national School Superintendents Association, and current superintendent of the Brown Deer School District. The UW System Task Force for Advancing Teachers and School Leaders in the State of Wisconsin was announced Jan. 25. The task force will have eight members in all and is to produce a report and recommendations by May 1, 2019, for presentation to the UW System Board of Regents Education Committee in June.
Fri
Jan
25
The Capital Times recently ​published an article headlined, “Artist Jerry Butler is making his mark,” that gives a fascinating look at his career as an artist and educator. Butler received his master of fine arts degree from the School of Education’s Art Department in 1972 and a Ph.D. from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 1995. He has gone on to enjoy ​an ​impressive and multifaceted career.
Fri
Jan
25
UW-Madison’s Ross Benbow and Matthew Hora co-authored a new research paper examining the cultural nature of skills necessary to be productively employed after college graduation. Their paper, “Reconsidering College Student Employability: A Cultural Analysis of Educator and Employer Conceptions of Workplace Skills,” appeared in the Harvard Educational Review.
Thu
Jan
24
The Chronicle of Higher Education released an article detailing the dos and don’ts of faculty searches at institutes of higher education. Among the many faculty members interviewed is UW-Madison’s Jerlando Jackson. The Chronicle explains how, more often than not, the search process can become chaotic.
Thu
Jan
24
Sandra Kowalczyk, a reading specialist at Patrick Marsh Middle School in Sun Prairie, received the 2018-19 Wisconsin Global Educator of the Year award in a brief ceremony Jan. 16 at the school. Kowalczyk is an alumna of UW-Madison, having earned a reading specialist license through the School of Education in 2005. Kowalczyk was recognized for her work to bring an international perspective to her classrooms and community.
Thu
Jan
24
UW-Madison's Shahanna McKinney Baldon was in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 19 for the National Women's March and played an important role in the event according to a news article from Madison365.com. The report notes: "Leading the march, the very first group in line, was a new international coalition of over 100 Jewish Women of Color. And leading the Jewish Women of Color — and carrying the Torah — was Madison’s own Shahanna McKinney Baldon." She is a 1993 alumna of the School of Education, and is the director of professional learning with the Minority Student Achievement Network (MSAN), which is housed within the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER)​.
Wed
Jan
23
Brava magazine recently released its “2019 Women to Watch” list, and among those being profiled is UW-Madison student Doua Kha. Kha, who is pursuing a master's degree from the School of Education's Department of Curriculum and Instruction, does important research and volunteer work to help other young people better understand their identities.
Tue
Jan
22
Hey students: Have you always wanted to volunteer in Madison but don’t know where to start? Join Badger Volunteers for the spring semester. Registration for all UW-Madison students opens Jan. 25 and there are more than 75 volunteering opportunities to choose from.
Tue
Jan
22
The Baraboo (Wisconsin) News Republic earlier this month put the spotlight on innovative rural education work being conducted by researchers at UW-Madison. The article explains how the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) started a “Teacher Speakout!” program in 2016. The newspaper interviews Katie McCabe, a doctoral student with the School of Education's special education program, for the report.
Mon
Jan
21
UW-Madison’s Gloria Ladson-Billings will deliver the featured keynote at the 2019 Reimagining Education Summer Institute hosted by Columbia University’s Teachers College. Ladson-Billings is a professor emerita with the School of Education and is the current president of the National Academy of Education.The Reimagining Education Summer Institute runs July 15-18 and will explore the opportunities and challenges of creating and sustaining racially, ethnically and socio-economically integrated schools.
Fri
Jan
18
WhoWhatWhy.org last month published a report explaining that, “nearly 65 years after the landmark 'Brown v. Board of Education' ruling, schools across the U.S. are quietly being resegregated — and many were never fully desegregated to start with. Among the experts utilized to put this topic in perspective is UW-Madison’s Walter Stern, an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies.
Fri
Jan
18
A new study shows refugees who resettle in Wisconsin face a daunting array of barriers, both systemic and situational, in getting college degrees. But creative remedies could be developed, UW−Madison researchers say, to ease their path to higher education and then to better jobs. The report is by Matthew Wolfgram, a senior researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, and assistant director of the Center for Research on College-Workforce Transitions.
Thu
Jan
17
“Little Brown,” written and illustrated by Marla Frazee, is the winner of the 22nd annual Charlotte Zolotow Award for outstanding writing in a picture book. The award is given by the Cooperative Children's Book Center (CCBC), a library housed within UW-Madison’s School of Education. “Little Brown” was edited by Allyn Johnston and published in the United States in 2018 by Beach Lane Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing. Do the other dogs not play with Little Brown because he’s cranky, or is he cranky because the other dogs don’t play with him? It’s a question examined with both humor and pathos in this marvelous picture book.
Thu
Jan
17
UW-Madison's Occupational Therapy program launched more than 75 years ago and remains on the leading edge of the OT field. In 2016, the program started offering a new Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD), enabling practitioners to advance their careers through a part-time, predominantly online curriculum. The OTD program, housed within the School of Education, is designed to train occupational therapists to become visionary leaders who will help transform the nation’s health and education systems, as well as address the needs of an aging society.

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