School of Education News

Sun
Jan
29
A project led by UW-Madison alumna and Madison East High School teacher Kate Brien to show support for undocumented students is garnering local media coverage. Madison's local NBC affiliate reports how Brien and her students designed and sold 2,000 T-shirts to raise money for scholarships for undocumented students and to show unity, celebrate diversity and push back against intolerance.
Fri
Jan
27
The Chronicle of Higher Education recently posted an in-depth report examining the so-called skills gap headlined, “The Idea That Launched a Thousand Strategic Plans.” Among the experts The Chronicle turns to in an effort to put this nuanced topic in perspective is UW-Madison’s Matthew Hora, a researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, which is housed within the School of Education. Hora and his colleagues spoke with both educators and employers about the skills gap for their recent book, “Beyond the Skills Gap: Preparing College Students for Life and Work.”
Fri
Jan
27
A Dance on Camera panel discussion at New York's Film Society on Feb. 6 will feature several leading teachers and administrators, including UW-Madison's Douglas Rosenberg, the chair of the School of Education's Art Department. The panel discussion will focus on unique curricula and how it incorporates emerging technology in dance and the changing landscape of dance film.
Thu
Jan
26
The work of UW-Madison’s John Hitchcock is being featured in a printmaking exhibition that includes more than 40 prints by a dozen contemporary Native American printmakers. Organized by the International Print Center New York, “New Impressions: Experiments in Contemporary Native American Printmaking,” runs through June 15 at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Hitchcock is the School of Education’s Associate Dean for the Arts, and a professor with the Art Department. He uses the print medium, with its long history of social and political commentary, to explore relationships of community, land and culture.
Thu
Jan
26
UW-Madison’s Lynda Barry was recently featured in a Washington Post article that garnered advice from great creative thinkers ​for the rising generation of female artists. Leading up to the Jan. 21 Women’s March on Washington, The Post’s Comic Riffs “asked eight great creative minds what advice they might have for the rising generation of young female artists, storytellers and other creatives in a world that can still present them with unique obstacles. What guidance might they offer gleaned from their own experience?” Barry shared some words of wisdom.
Thu
Jan
26
Michael Meissen, who earned his Ph.D. from UW-Madison's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis in 1990, was recently hired as a new consultant for K-12 initiatives at Madison Area Technical College. In his new position, Meissen will lead the process of creating a strategic plan that identifies the key K-12 priority areas for consideration by the college, maximizing student success and advancing Madison College's partnership with K-12 schools.
Wed
Jan
25
The work of several faculty members with UW-Madison's Art Department will be featured in upcoming art exhibits at Edgewood College from Jan. 26 through Feb 26. There is an opening reception scheduled for 5 to 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 26, at the Edgewood College Gallery, located in The Stream, 1000 Edgewood College Dr. , Madison, 53711.
Wed
Jan
25
UW-Madison’s Julie Mead was in Texas on Jan. 23 to take part in a symposium hosted by the Austin-based Coalition for Public Schools. A report from the Austin American-Statesman newspaper noted how researchers at the symposium explained how other states’ voucher systems failed to hold private schools accountable and improve the performance of students, particularly those who are lower income. Mead is a professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.
Wed
Jan
25
The Spring 2017 Artist in Residence is Peter Krsko, whose residency is presented by the UW-Madison Arts Institute. Krsko is a bio-inspired artist whose approach combines science and art; participatory, interactive and community arts; and play with hands-on education. He creates collaborative and community public art, such as sculptures and murals, inspired by biological concepts of diversity, differentiation, participation and co-ownership.
Tue
Jan
24
UW-Madison School of Education Dean Diana Hess recently spoke with the Badger Herald about the university's Engaging the Humanities program and how it can make a significant difference for students seeking jobs outside academia. Hess, who also holds the Karen A. Falk Distinguished Chair of Education, tells the Badger Herald that the program is particularly exciting because it provides new opportunities for academic staff and is designed to have a real effect on the community, in line with the Wisconsin Idea.
Tue
Jan
24
UW-Madison's Nicholas Hillman was quoted in a recent Wisconsin State Journal column about Assembly Speaker Robin Vos' critiques of Gov. Scott Walker's proposed tuition cuts for the UW System. Hillman, an associate professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, researches federal student aid, state funding models and educational opportunity.
Tue
Jan
24
Internationally acclaimed guest artist Rosalind Newman is in residence with the School of Education’s Dance Department Jan. 17 through Feb. 4. She is working with 12 student dancers on a project that will be presented in the annual faculty concert "Neither East Nor West" in February.
Mon
Jan
23
A WISCAPE blog post discusses ​how to improve the racial climate at UW-Madison and introduces a set of recommendations from a collective of black alumni and their allies. The post, titled "Creating a place to remember fondly," was authored by Harvey Long and Valyncia C. Raphael, an alumna of the University of Wisconsin Law School (J.D., 2013) and the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis (Ph.D., 2016).
Mon
Jan
23
UW-Madison’s Robert Enright has recently been invited to become a regular blogger for Psychology Today. His blog for Psychology Today is called, “The Forgiving Life.” Enright has pioneered the study of forgiveness in locations across the world for three decades. He is a professor with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology, and also is a co-founder of the International Forgiveness Institute.
Mon
Jan
23
UW-Madison alumnus Edward Holmes was recently featured in the Wisconsin State Journal’s “Know Your Madisonian” report. Holmes was recently named the Overture Center's first executive director of diversity and inclusion. In his new position, Holmes says he will be working on making the Overture Center more inclusive, both in terms of the staff and the patrons it serves. Holmes received a Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and he also is a member of the School of Education’s Board of Visitors.
Fri
Jan
20
UW-Madison’s Noah Weeth Feinstein, with collaborators from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Chicago-based artist Jenny Kendler, will develop and evaluate “Garden for a Changing Climate,” a mobile public art project and interactive event series. Comprised of a series of moveable planters of native Midwestern species, “Garden for a Changing Climate” directly embodies the otherwise largely invisible, slow and dispersed threat of climate change. “This project is right smack at the intersection of the two things I am most interested in right now: out-of-school science and climate change adaptation,” says Weeth Feinstein, an associate professor with the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
Fri
Jan
20
UW-Madison recently announced 16 proposals from across campus that will be receiving funding through the university’s EI Small Grant Program. And among those receiving support are the School of Education's Adam Nelson and Natalie Zervou. Nelson, who chairs the Department of Educational Policy Studies, and Zervou, a lecturer with the Dance Department, both plan to use the EI Small Grant funding to create new online classes.
Thu
Jan
19
The UW-Madison Dance Department kicks off the second half of its 90th anniversary year with its annual faculty concert, “Neither East Nor West.” The concert runs Feb. 2-4 and 9-11 at the Margaret H’Doubler Performance Space in Lathrop Hall. “Neither East Nor West” features the original choreography of New York guest artist and UW-Madison alumna Rosalind Newman, and six contemporary dance works by UW-Madison artists Kate Corby, Li Chiao-Ping, Liz Sexe, Marlene Skog, Chris Walker, and Jin-Wen Yu.
Thu
Jan
19
David Tandberg and Nick Hillman’s 2013 WISCAPE policy brief was referenced in a recent Wisconsin State Journal article discussing the implications of Gov. Scott Walker’s proposal that UW System funding should be correlated with how many System students find jobs in Wisconsin.
Thu
Jan
19
This month Project 1808, led by School of Education alumna Linda Vakunta, launched the Ebola Survivors Livelihood Skills development program. Vakunta earned her master’s degree in rehabilitation psychology from the School of Education in 2011 and is both the program lead and Project 1808 executive director. The program is funded by a one-year grant from the Sierra Leone U.S. Embassy office and is expected to train over 70 Ebola survivors at Rokel in computer training, catering, driving and tailoring.

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