Research News

Tue
Nov
21
UW-Madison alumnus Simon Goldberg recently co-authored an article published in the journal Clinical Psychology Review about mindfulness-based interventions for psychiatric disorders. Says Goldberg, who received his Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology: "Rather than viewing mindfulness as an 'alternative' therapy, our study suggests mindfulness on average shows similar effects to other frontline treatments, things like cognitive-behavior therapy and antidepressant medications."
Mon
Nov
20
UW-Madison’s Michael W. Apple delivered the keynote address at the Re-Imagining Education for Democracy Summit in Queensland, Australia, on Nov. 13. Apple’s address was titled, “Can Education Change Society?” Apple writes that while it is important to offer analyses and critiques of the way the terrain of educational reform has been dominated by neoliberal and neoconservative policies, it is equally important to build critically democratic alternatives.
Fri
Nov
17
UW-Madison’s Carolyn Kelley and Alexandra Pavlakis of Southern Methodist University co-authored a paper that received the 2017 Journal of Research on Leadership Education’s Best Article Award. The award-wining research article is titled, “Accreditation in the Professions Implications for Educational Leadership Preparation Programs.” Kelley is the School of Education’s senior associate dean for academic programs and is a professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. Pavlakis is an alumna of UW-Madison and an assistant professor at SMU.
Fri
Nov
17
The American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE) selected UW-Madison’s Laura Chávez-Moreno as an AAHHE Ford Foundation Graduate Student Fellow for 2018. Chávez-Moreno is a Ph.D. candidate with the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction. As part of this prestigious honor, Chávez-Moreno will attend the annual AAHHE Conference March 8-10 in Irvine, Calif., where she will be presenting her dissertation research.
Wed
Nov
15
A recent article co-authored by UW-Madison alumnus Simon Goldberg is putting the spotlight on the need for more rigorous research into mindfulness-based interventions. The paper is titled, “Is mindfulness research methodology improving over time? A systematic review,” and it appeared in the open-access journal PLOS One. Goldberg, who received his Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology in August, is the lead author on the report. He is currently completing his postdoctoral fellowship in Health Services Research & Development at the Seattle VA and the University of Washington.
Wed
Nov
15
School of Education Dean Diana Hess is receiving the 2017 Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career Research Award from the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS). This prestigious annual honor recognizes professionals who have made extensive contributions to knowledge concerning significant areas of social studies education through meritorious research. The award will be presented to Hess in San Francisco on Wednesday, Nov. 15, at the NCSS 97th Annual Conference, during the College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) Business Meeting.
Tue
Nov
14
Developed at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, part of UW–Madison’s School of Education, the Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning (CALL) is a one-of-a-kind, online survey and automated feedback system that measures leadership practices across an entire school. The CALL survey was created in 2009 by School of Education faculty members Richard Halverson and Carolyn Kelley. The two co-authored a new book about their work titled, "Mapping Leadership: The Tasks That Matter for Improving Teaching and Learning in Schools."
Tue
Nov
14
UW-Madison's Daniel Corral co-authored a recent article that highlights the many contributions being made by minority serving institutions (MSIs) in higher education. The report is titled, “Minority Serving Institutions: A Data-Driven Student Landscape in the Outcomes-Based Funding Universe,” and it appears in the University of California-Berkeley’s Review of Education. Corral is a doctoral student with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.
Mon
Nov
13
UW-Madison’s Gloria Ladson-Billings became the new president of the National Academy of Education (NAEd) during the group’s fall research retreat in Washington, D.C., on Friday, Nov. 10. “I look forward to the opportunity to lead what is the premier assemblage of education scholars in the world,” says Ladson-Billings, the School of Education's Kellner Family Distinguished Chair in Urban Education.
Mon
Nov
13
UW-Madison's Laura Hamman has published an article in Language and Education about the impact of translanguaging in two-way dual language immersion (DLI) contexts. Hamman is a Ph.D. candidate with the School of Education's Department of Curriculum and Instruction, specializing in English as a second language and bilingual education. Hamman's dissertation explores the language and literacy practices of emergent bilinguals in two-way immersion classrooms and considers how classroom practices, policies and ideologies shape students' bilingualism.
Sat
Nov
11
The research of UW-Madison's Dane Cook examining white matter damage and pain in veterans is featured in a news story from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Cook is a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology and a research physiologist with the Department of Veterans Affairs. “Changes in brain white matter show that there is something wrong in the central nervous system that may explain why the veteran is experiencing widespread pain," says Cook.
Wed
Nov
08
UW-Madison's Andrea Ruppar ​is receiving the Early Career Publication Award from the Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children. Ruppar is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. The paper was published in the journal Teacher Education and Special Education, and is part of a larger project exploring perceptions about expertise for teachers of students with significant support needs.
Tue
Nov
07
UW-Madison's Percival Matthews recently co-authored a journal article titled, "An Emoji is Worth a Thousand Variables." Matthews is an assistant professor with the School of Education's Department of Educational Psychology. The article -- which appears in the journal The Mathematics Teacher and is co-authored with teacher Tony McCaffrey -- explores the potential of icon-based mathematical games, emoji math and mobile math to promote student engagement and understanding of algebra.
Tue
Nov
07
UW-Madison's Douglas Rosenberg will give a lecture titled "Hiding in Plain Site: Screendance Histories and the Expanded Imagination," on Nov. 9 at Stanford University. Rosenberg is the chair of the School of Education's Art Department. The talk will visualize a history of screendance and its theory and practice in a way that focuses on the intersections of choreography, visual arts, theater, storytelling and more.
Tue
Oct
31
UW-Madison’s Erika Bullock is receiving the Taylor & Francis Best Paper award for her recently published report, “Only STEM can Save Us? Examining Race, Place and STEM Education as Property.” Each year, the American Educational Studies Association’s Taylor & Francis Best Paper Committee reviews all of the manuscripts published in the journal Educational Studies for the year. The committee then selects one as the paper of the year.
Thu
Oct
26
UW-Madison's Erica Turner recently published an article with the ​online Journal of Education Policy about the marketing practices of school districts that emphasize the "racial diversity" of their students and schools while attracting new families. "Public schools serve students across ethnic, racial, linguistic, gender, and class lines, but this study asks scholars and practitioners to consider more deeply what it means to value diversity and what relationship diversity has with equity in education, particularly in increasingly marketized educational environments," says Turner, an assistant professor with the School of Education's Department of Educational Policy Studies.
Mon
Oct
16
A team of researchers, including UW-Madison’s Amy Bellmore, has found that not only is an ethnically diverse school good for students’ cultural appreciation, but it may also be good for their grades. The report is titled, “Early Adolescents’ Peer Experiences with Ethnic Diversity in Middle School: Implications for Academic Outcomes,” and it appears in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence. The report found that all students in the study benefited academically from cross-ethnic peer interactions.
Wed
Oct
11
UW-Madison's Ellie Bruecker authored a policy memo analyzing the fiscal effects of Wisconsin's expanded statewide Parental Choice Program, describing how the voucher program impacts school districts across the state. Bruecker is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. Her analysis finds that while the fiscal effects of the program on public school districts are still relatively small, they are likely to grow over time.
Wed
Oct
11
UW-Madison's Jerlando Jackson will give a talk on Wednesday, Oct. 11, at the College of William & Mary as part of the institution's Diversity Lecture Series. The talk is titled, "Diversity Prism Imperative: Advancing Organizational Ownership of Disparities in Higher Education." In the talk, Jackson will discuss his new working concept of Diversity Prism Imperative in relation to the changing landscape of student bodies, faculty and staff at colleges and universities in the United States growing more diverse.
Tue
Oct
10
Governments and higher education institutions are rushing into the internship game, enthusiastically cheerleading the concept. On the surface, work-based learning appears to be beneficial for everyone. Employers get an inexpensive extra hand who could later become a new hire, students acquire valuable, real-world experience while still in school and educators enhance a student’s classroom knowledge with hands-on learning. But Matt Hora says it's time to take a step back and take a closer look at what we start mandating for students.