Research News

Fri
Apr
03
UW-Madison’s Brittany Travers is the lead author of a new publication that examines how the corpus callosum develops in autism from childhood into adulthood. Titled, “Atypical development of white matter microstructure of the corpus callosum in males with autism: a longitudinal investigation,” the paper appears in the journal, Molecular Autism.
Thu
Apr
02
UW-Madison’s Kate Corby was awarded funding through the Vilas Associates Competition and will use those dollars to research the history, practice and performance of the cham — the ancient meditation dances of Vajrayana Buddhism — which are an integral part of cultural life in the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan. The cham date back to the 8th century and are performed almost entirely by monks.
Wed
Apr
01
A research paper co-authored by UW-Madison’s Richard Halverson has been chosen for the Journal of School Leadership’s 25th anniversary special issue. Halverson’s paper, “The New Instructional Leadership: Creating Data-Driven Instructional Systems in Schools,” originally was published in the Journal of School Leadership in 2007. In commemoration of the journal’s anniversary, its former editors selected articles that best captured the theory, empirical research and practice critical to their time, and then considered their implications on modern-day systems and scholarship.
Tue
Mar
31
A paper by UW-Madison’s Andrea Harris was recently published in the Journal of American Drama and Theatre. The paper is titled, “Sur la Pointe on the Prairie: Giuseppina Morlacchi and the Urban Problem in the Frontier Melodrama.” Harris is an assistant professor with the Dance Department who is a dance historian and Certified Movement Analyst.
Mon
Mar
30
The Higher Education Video Game Alliance recently released a survey of 73 higher education video game design programs around the United States and it indicates that more women and minority participants are in these programs than computer science and other tech fields. A report in GamesandLearning.org explains how this survey “creates the first accurate snapshot of the field,” according to Alliance Executive Director and UW-Madison faculty member Constance Steinkuehler.
Mon
Mar
30
A recent addition to the Wisconsin Center for Education Research’s project portfolio is the LEAD Center, a higher education evaluation team directed by Christine Pribbenow. WCER is housed within UW-Madison’s School of Education. Pribbenow brings years of experience helping people improve their performance in fields as diverse as biomedical research, genomics education for undergraduates, biology instruction, and gender and racial awareness. Her team serves projects across the UW-Madison campus, the state of Wisconsin and nationally.
Sat
Mar
28
UW-Madison’s Gay Ivey was recently elected to the office of vice president of the Literacy Research Association. She will serve as the organization's president in 2018. This will then mark the first time a faculty member from UW-Madison has served as president of the Literacy Research Association. Ivey is the Tashia F. Morgridge Chair in Reading with the School of Education’s top-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
Fri
Mar
27
UW-Madison’s Bianca Baldridge will be delivering a presentation at next week’s Journal of Youth Studies Conference 2015 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Baldridge will take part in a session on Tuesday, March 31, and will present on her work that examines the impact of neoliberalism on community-based educational spaces. Her talk is titled, “Race, Education, and Youth Work: (Re)Imagining Black Youth in Neoliberal Times.”
Wed
Mar
25
UW-Madison alumna Julie Stamm is the lead author of a recent study out of the Boston University School of Medicine that points to a possible increased risk of cognitive impairment from playing youth football. Stamm conducted this research as part of a team at Boston University’s Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, and later this spring she will be receiving her Ph.D. in anatomy and neurobiology. The native of Mosinee, Wisconsin, earned her undergraduate degree from UW-Madison’s Athletic Training program in 2009.
Mon
Mar
23
UW-Madison alumni Mary and Ted Kellner have decided to strengthen their ongoing support of the university and its School of Education by providing a generous gift of $1.5 million that will establish a new Distinguished Chair position. These funds will sponsor a new faculty member who specializes in child development, social-emotional learning, and mindfulness-based approaches in education. While this person’s faculty home will be the School of Education, whoever fills this post will work closely with the university’s Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the Waisman Center.
Mon
Mar
23
UW-Madison’s Aydin Bal recently authored an article for the Equity Alliance Blog that’s headlined, “Beyond the Color of Discipline: Radical Possibilities for Culturally Responsive School Discipline.” Bal is an assistant professor of special education who studies racial disproportionality and capacity building in local education agencies for systemic transformation.
Mon
Mar
23
UW-Madison’s Simon Goldberg was recently selected to receive the Kenneth Howard Memorial Student Travel Award for an upcoming poster presentation at the 2015 Society for Psychotherapy Research’s International Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. Goldberg is a Ph.D. student with UW-Madison’s Department of Counseling Psychology. His poster presentation is titled, "Therapist effects in trajectories of change: Do therapist effects manifest differently for short versus long-term clients?"
Sat
Mar
21
UW-Madison’s Chris Walker is traveling to New York and Toronto to present works and conduct workshops as part of his ongoing research on African Diasporic contemporary performance.
Fri
Mar
20
UW-Madison’s David Kaplan is one of 16 leading researchers and exceptional educators to be recently elected to membership in the National Academy of Education. Kaplan is the Patricia Busk Professor of Quantitative Methods and chair of the top-ranked Department of Educational Psychology. NAEd advances high quality education research and its use in policy formation and practice. Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2015, the NAEd consists of 192 U.S. members and 11 foreign associates who are elected on the basis of outstanding scholarship related to education.
Fri
Mar
20
UW-Madison’s William Schrage earlier this year was selected for an appointment as a Vilas Associate. Schrage is an associate professor with the Department of Kinesiology who is focusing on how nerves and blood vessels control blood flow in response to exercise and environmental stressors like low oxygen. His lab studies how conditions like obesity alter control, and how this may contribute to cardiovascular disease later in life.
Mon
Mar
16
To determine how the public and private pre-kindergarten systems might work together more efficiently, UW-Madison's Beth Graue and colleagues recently interviewed Wisconsin educators and state policymakers. “Wisconsin is a good example of the rapidly evolving policy landscape,” says Graue, the School of Education’s Sorenson Professor of Curriculum and Instruction.
Sat
Mar
14
UW-Madison’s Bruce Wampold will be giving a talk on Friday, March 20 about his recently released book, “The Great Psychotherapy Debate (second edition).” The event is being hosted by the Department of Counseling Psychology as part of the Diversity and Social Justice Committee’s Colloquium Series.
Wed
Mar
11
UW-Madison’s Fong Chan, Norman Berven and Kenneth Thomas are co-editors of the second edition of “Counseling Theories and Techniques for Rehabilitation and Mental Health Professionals,” which was recently released in paperback by Springer Publishing Company.
Sat
Mar
07
Sara Goldrick-Rab and Steven Durlauf -- two UW-Madison professors with opposing points of view -- will discuss the merits of President Barack Obama’s recent proposal to offer free tuition to students for two years at community colleges. The talk will be held on Thursday, March 12, and runs from 12:15 to 1:30 p.m. in the Education Building’s Wisconsin Idea Room. It is free and open to the public.
Fri
Mar
06
An article in the Chronicle of Higher Education asks what would happen if we committed Pell Grant money to eighth-grade students from low-income families in order to encourage them to stay on the college path. The article points to a paper written by Robert Kelchen and Sara Goldrick-Rab, which examines the costs and benefits of this commitment.