Research News

Mon
Aug
18
An exercise machine that helps stroke victims learn to walk, which was developed by the Department of Kinesiology's Kreg Gruben, was a beneficiary of the first round of awards by UW-Madison's Discovery to Product, or D2P, program, which began operating in March. The 17 grants announced last week will support innovations in many fields of research at the university, from food engineering and medicine to stem cell biology and biomedical engineering.
Tue
Aug
12
Self-affirmation writing exercises improved the achievement, especially in mathematics, of students who may suffer from stereotype threat. Geoffrey Borman, who is a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and colleagues found that writing helps students gain relatively “quick wins.” As these accumulate in a recursive process, like a chain reaction, the gains are carried forward.
Mon
Aug
04
From Afghanistan to Zambia, international schools are reconsidering their approach to teaching English language learners, and many are looking to tap into WIDA’s expertise. The 2014 WIDA International Summer Academy, which took place July 14-18 in Madison, was WIDA’s first professional development academy specifically for international schools. The workshop was designed for teachers to learn how WIDA standards and assessments can meet the needs of English language learners (ELLs) in international schools.
Wed
Jul
30
UW–Madison’s Wisconsin HOPE Lab has released an evaluation of Single Stop USA’s Community College Initiative. The Implementation Assessment, which was authored by Sara Goldrick-Rab, Katharine Broton, and Victoria M. Frank, is the first in a series of evaluations to fulfill the requirements of a Social Innovation Fund award to Single Stop USA.
Wed
Jul
23
A team of researchers from UW-Madison received a $3.5 million grant from the Institute of Education Sciences and the National Center for Education Research to build upon its promising Project LEAP (Learning through an Early Algebra Progression) initiative over the next four years. Project LEAP is attempting to more deeply examine how the development of children’s algebraic thinking at a younger age may impact their understanding of core algebraic concepts in comparison to students who receive more traditional, arithmetic-based instruction.
Thu
Jul
17
UW-Madison’s Department of Educational Psychology is hosting the 79th annual International Meeting of the Psychometric Society (IMPS), a professional organization devoted to the advancement of quantitative measurement practices in psychology, education and the social sciences. The 2014 meeting, which kicks off with pre-conference workshops on July 21 and runs through July 25, will be held at The Pyle Center and The Lowell Center on the UW-Madison campus.
Wed
Jul
16
What happens to race in public discussions about “race-neutral” college admissions policies? UW-Madison’s Rachelle Winkle-Wagner is the lead author of a an article recently published in the July issue of Educational Policy titled, “When Race Disappears: College Admissions Policy Discourse in the State of Texas.”
Thu
Jul
10
Enlarging the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) pipeline in Wisconsin is vital to increasing and maintaining its economic stature, according to a new article co-authored by Wisconsin’s Equity and Inclusion Laboratory (Wei LAB) Director Jerlando F. L. Jackson, Wei LAB Assistant Director LaVar J. Charleston, and University of Florida Professor of Computer Science Juan E. Gilbert.
Fri
Jul
04
The latest edition of Learning Connections, the School of Education’s alumni magazine, is now posted online. The cover stories for this most recent issue include a look at The Network, a new project within the School that’s building collaborations between university researchers and educators in the field, and an article showcasing the Wisconsin HOPE Lab, which is examining some of the most critical issues facing higher education today.
Thu
Jul
03
To David Kaplan, Bayesian statistics are enlightening, capable of bringing clarity to difficult problems. But as much as Kaplan, a professor of quantitative methods and chair of the Department of Educational Psychology at UW–Madison, advocates for the increased use of Bayesian methods in quantitative research, he warns that researchers should make their initial forays with caution. A new book by Kaplan is due out in mid-August and it titled, “Bayesian Statistics for the Social Sciences.”
Fri
Jun
27
UW-Madison’s Elizabeth Pier won the Best Student Paper Award at the 2014 International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) on Friday in Boulder, Colo. Pier, who is a doctoral student with the Department of Educational Psychology, is the first author of, “Hear What They Say and Watch What They Do: Predicting Valid Mathematical Proofs Using Speech and Gesture.”
Thu
Jun
26
The CUNA Mutual Group announced Thursday it is committing $1.2 million to Forward Madison, a collaborative between the UW-Madison School of Education and the Madison Metropolitan School District that was announced in March. Forward Madison strengthens the long-standing relationships between the School of Education and Madison Schools by supporting new educators, providing continued professional learning for educators and improving the diversity of MMSD’s workforce.
Tue
Jun
24
UW-Madison’s Mindi Thompson is receiving the 2014 Early Career Professional Award from the Society for Vocational Psychology. She is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology. This prestigious award goes to a person who demonstrates a substantial commitment and contribution to the field of career and vocational psychology within seven years of receiving a doctoral degree.
Mon
Jun
23
UW-Madison’s David Kaplan delivered a keynote address at the Fourth Congress on Measurement and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, which was held June 9-13 at Hacettepe University in Ankara, Turkey. His keynote on June 13 was titled, “Missing Data Issues in Large Scale Educational Assessments: Challenges and Opportunities,” and focused on how multiple large scale educational data could be combined to provide additional value over any single educational data source.
Fri
Jun
20
The Teachers College Record recently posted a paper co-authored by UW-Madison Professor Emeritus Kenneth Zeichner that examines the role of venture philanthropy in shaping public policy in teacher education. The paper is titled “Venture Philanthropy and Teacher Education Policy in the U.S: The Role of the New Schools Venture Fund.”
Thu
Jun
19
Teachers from across the state will be on the UW-Madison campus Friday, June 20, showcasing their work during an annual Celebration of Research event. Four cohorts of teachers -– two from rural Wisconsin, one from the Milwaukee area and one from Madison -- have spent much of the 2013-14 academic year engaged in provocative and informative action research projects. They'll be sharing their findings from 9 a.m. to noon in the Town Center of the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery.
Fri
Jun
13
UW–Madison education professor Carolyn Kelley and graduate student Jason Salisbury examined the opportunities for improving the success of department chairs in advancing learning. Kelley is chair of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. The two worked with six large, urban, comprehensive high schools in two urban school districts.
Wed
Jun
11
UW-Madison’s Mitch Nathan was invited by the National Academy of Engineering and the National Research Council to present in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, June 12 during an event designed to bring further attention to a report that examines integrating the STEM subjects -- science, technology, engineering and math -– in K-12 education.
Tue
Jun
10
A common explanation for the nation's sluggish economy in the media and policymaking circles focuses on the “skills gap,” which is a structural mismatch between the supply of workers with particular skill sets and employers’ demands for qualified workers. Instead of studying whether or not a skills gap exists, WCER scientist Matthew Hora is focused on a more fundamental problem: describing the nature of employer expectations and whether or not they are aligned with the postsecondary curriculum in two- and four-year colleges and universities.
Mon
Jun
09
More than 700 scholars, teachers, game developers, publishers and more are descending on Madison this week for the 10th edition of the Games+Learning+Society (GLS) Conference. This years event –- which is the largest games and learning conference of its kind -- runs June 10-13 at the Memorial Union on the UW-Madison campus.