Research News

Thu
Jan
29
The second edition of Bruce Wampold’s, “The Great Psychotherapy Debate: The Evidence for What Makes Psychotherapy Work,” has been updated and revised to expand the presentation of the Contextual Model, which is derived from a scientific understanding of how humans heal in a social context and explains findings from a vast array of psychotherapies studies.
Wed
Jan
28
An article by UW-Madison’s Erica Turner was recently published by the American Educational Research Journal. The paper is titled, “Districts’ Responses to Demographic Change: Making Sense of Race, Class and Immigration in Political and Organizational Context." Its abstract notes that that “many U.S. public school systems now face three large demographic shifts: rising poverty, the growing number of students from immigrant families, and increasing populations of students of color. Yet, we know little about how district policymakers react to these important changes.”
Fri
Jan
23
A public policy pre-conference forum at the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) conference brought together a group of performance funding scholars and practitioners, including the UW’s Nicholas Hillman, to examine the landscape of performance-based funding policies and to discuss future directions for this increasingly-popular policy instrument.
Thu
Jan
15
UW-Madison’s Maisha T. Winn is the author of an essay that appears in a new book titled, “Girls in Justice.” Winn is UW-Madison’s Susan J. Cellmer Chair in English Education, and is a professor of language and literacy with the top-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction. The section authored by Winn is titled, "Between 'Black girls rock' and a hard place," and it examines racial disparities in the punishment of black girls in the juvenile justice system.
Wed
Jan
14
Performance-based funding is falling short of its intended goals of raising student retention and degree completion rates at community colleges, according to a new research paper co-authored by UW-Madison's Nicholas Hillman. “Tying state financing to college ‘performance’ is expected to create an incentive for colleges to produce more degree recipients and retain students at higher rates. However, evidence from the Washington experiment suggests these results do not occur in systematic ways,” says Hillman
Tue
Jan
13
A paper co-authored by UW-Madison’s Mitchell Nathan that examines the effectiveness –- and ineffectiveness -- of various learning techniques is being highlighted in a special edition of Scientific American Mind magazine. The “Your Inner Genius” special edition, released earlier this month, features a write-up headlined, “What Works, What Doesn’t." The article preview notes: "Some study techniques accelerate learning, whereas others are just a waste of time — but which ones are which? An unprecedented review maps out the best pathways to follow.”
Mon
Jan
12
UW-Madison’s Kristen Pickett is looking for about a dozen individuals who have Parkinson’s disease to take part in a free program that will examine the benefits of Tango dancing. Pickett explains that exercise has been shown to benefit individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Specifically, gait (walking), disease severity and quality of life have all shown improvement following controlled exercise studies.
Mon
Jan
05
What are the purposes of public education? Are they the right kinds of purposes now, and were they the right kinds of purposes 50 years ago? Questions like this will be addressed by a new interdisciplinary Center for Ethics and Education to be housed in the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) at UW-Madison’s School of Education.
Wed
Dec
31
The latest edition of Learning Connections, the School of Education’s alumni magazine, is now posted online.
Mon
Dec
29
UW-Madison’s Linn Posey-Maddox is the lead author of a paper that was recently published in the British Journal of Sociology of Education. The paper is titled, “Seeking a ‘critical mass’: middle-class parents’ collective engagement in city public schooling.”
Mon
Dec
22
A recording of Douglas N. Harris's recent webcast, in which he discusses his new working paper examining 50 years of the Upward Bound program, is now available through Blackboard Collaborate. WISCAPE hosted the webcast, which was also co-sponsored by the Institute for Research on Poverty.
Mon
Dec
15
UW-Madison’s David Kaplan is delivering three lectures at this week’s Joint Research Center of the European Commission. Kaplan chairs the highly regarded Department of Educational Psychology and is a professor of quantitative methods. Kaplan was invited to give three lectures Dec. 15-17 to the Applied Statistics and Econometrics Unit of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy.
Tue
Dec
09
Students entering college generally have an idea that studying science, technology, engineering, or math -- the STEM disciplines -- can lead to a good-paying job after they graduate. But varying definitions of what exactly qualifies as a STEM career can be misleading not just to students, but also to researchers and economists who study the state of the U.S. economy and predict future occupational needs, explain experts with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research.
Mon
Dec
08
Nicholas Hillman recently discussed the problem of ‘education deserts' in a brown bag discussion hosted by WISCAPE. Slides from Hillman's talk are now available, and video is also available via the School of Education YouTube channel.
Fri
Dec
05
Upward Bound was one of the original federal Great Society programs of the 1960s and it remains the single largest college access program in the country. On Tuesday, Dec. 9, the Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education (WISCAPE) is hosting a webcast featuring Douglas Harris as he discusses his WISCAPE working paper that takes a look at the program 50 years after its inception. This paper is co-authored by Alan Nathan and Ryne Marksteiner.
Thu
Dec
04
UW-Madison Professor Diana Hess and alumna Paula McAvoy have published a new book titled, “The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education,” that is based on the findings from a large, mixed-method study about discussions of political issues within high school classrooms. "We hope this book will be a useful resource for teachers, teacher educators, and researchers who are interested in how schools can prepare young people to participate in democracy during these highly polarized times,” says Hess.
Wed
Dec
03
UW-Madison's Harry Brighouse and Anthony Laden, a philosophy professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, will launch a new center to incorporate philosophical thinking into educational policy and practice. The Center for Ethics and Education will be funded by a recent $3.5 million grant from the Spencer Foundation, and it will be housed in the Wisconsin Center for Education and Research at the School of Education.
Wed
Dec
03
UW-Madison’s Brittany Travers is a co-author of a recent paper examining why individuals with autism spectrum disorder struggle with decision making. The report, which appears in the journal Autism Research, notes that “decision making plays a key role in daily function, but little is known regarding how individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) make decisions.”
Tue
Dec
02
UW-Madison’s Mitchell Nathan is the lead author of a new paper within the paradigm of “embodied cognition,” which explores how our bodies and actions may directly impact our thoughts. The paper is titled, “Actions Speak Louder with Words: The Roles of Action and Pedagogical Language for Grounding Mathematical Reasoning,” and it’s published in the journal Learning and Instruction.
Thu
Nov
27
UW-Madison’s Amy Stambach will give a presentation titled, “Ethnography and the Localization of Global Education Policy,” at the University of Bath on Tuesday, Dec. 2. The presentation draws from work-in-progress, to appear in “The 2015 Handbook of Global Policy and Policy-making in Education.”