Research News

Mon
Mar
12
A paper co-authored by UW-Madison's Allen Phelps and Eric Camburn in the Journal of Pre-College Engineering Education Research examines the role pre-college engineering courses play in a student's choice of a STEM college major. Through their research, the paper found that students who earned three credits through high school engineering and engineering technology courses were 1.6 times more likely to enroll in STEM majors. This finding persisted "even after controlling for students’ social backgrounds, academic preparation and attitudes during high school, college choice considerations, and early postsecondary education experiences."
Wed
Mar
07
UW-Madison alumna Alexandra Pavlakis has published a new article in the journal Educational Researcher titled, "Spaces, Places, and Policies: Contextualizing Student Homelessness." Pavlakis received her Ph.D. in 2015 from the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. The article explores the diversity of the ways students and families experience homelessness and high mobility. Pavlakis discusses the ways residential space and geographic space shape students' educational opportunities and experiences.
Wed
Mar
07
There will be a panel discussion and a gallery exhibition reception for a new exhibit, "Twice Alive: A Convergence of Art, Science and Poetry," on March 21. The panel discussion will feature Emily Arthur, Forrest Gander and Anne Pringle. At the exhibition reception Lynn Keller will introduce this interdisciplinary collaboration exploring the relations of science and art through the study of lichens and fungi.
Thu
Mar
01
UW-Madison’s David Williamson Shaffer will be delivering a keynote address at the Learning Analytics and Knowledge Conference, which runs March 5-9, 2018, in Sydney, Australia. Shaffer is the Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Learning Sciences with the No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology. Shaffer is an expert on teaching and assessing 21st Century skills through educational games.
Wed
Feb
28
UW-Madison alumna Jennifer Seelig’s dissertation research examining educational policy in rural Wisconsin is receiving recognition from two different groups associated with the American Educational Research Association -- Division L (educational policy and politics) and the rural education special interest group. Seelig received her Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies in 2017. Her ethnographic study examines a small town in Northern Wisconsin. "I am very pleased that my colleagues acknowledge the importance of considering the effects of educational policies in rural contexts," says Seelig.
Sun
Feb
25
Adam Nelson, an alumnus of UW-Madison, was selected to receive the 2018 Dissertation of the Year Award from the Association for Student Conduct Administration (ASCA). Nelson earned his Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis in 2017. Nelson’s dissertation is titled, "Learning and Development as a Result of Student Conduct Administration." Reviewers noted how Nelson’s dissertation is contributing to the field’s knowledge base and professional practice, adding that his research methodology was sound and thorough.
Sat
Feb
24
Jacob Lindheimer has been selected by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Office of Research and Development to receive a five-year Career Development Award. Lindheimer is a third-year post-doctoral fellow with the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology, where he works with faculty member Dane Cook’s Exercise Psychology Lab. The long-term goal of ​Lindheimer's research project, “Acute exercise tolerance among Veterans with Gulf War Illness,” is to develop an evidence-based exercise dose that can be prescribed to Veterans with Gulf War Illness.
Fri
Feb
23
Kathryn Moeller first started looking into efforts by major corporations and their foundations to support girls and young women in Latin America, Africa and Asia more than a decade ago. At the time, several global brands, such as Nike and ExxonMobil, were getting behind theories promoted by some economists in the early 1990s that considered investing in girls’ and women’s education to be the most efficient way to end poverty and promote development. Moeller’s extensive research examining these efforts was released in a new book in February titled, “The Gender Effect: Capitalism, Feminism, and the Corporate Politics of Development.”
Thu
Feb
22
UW-Madison's David Bell, Eric Post, Daniel Schaefer and Stephanie Trigsted co-authored a new study titled, "Sports Specialization Characteristics Between Rural and Suburban High School Athletes." The study set out to explore the differences in sport participation characteristics between suburban and rural high schools, and how the differences may correlate with overuse injuries. The resulting data indicates high school athletes at suburban high schools who classified as highly specialized and engaging in a high competition volume are more likely to be associated with a higher risk of overuse injury.
Tue
Feb
20
A book from UW-Madison’s Richard Halverson and Carolyn Kelley was showcased as a “director’s pick” at last week’s AASA, the School Superintendents Association, conference in Nashville, Tenn. Halverson and Kelley are co-authors of “Mapping Leadership: The Tasks that Matter for Improving Teaching and Learning in Schools,” which was released in 2017. This publication is based on 20 years of combined research on school effectiveness and leadership, and maps the quality of school leadership and tells schools the next stages for improving teaching and learning for their students.
Tue
Feb
20
UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman will be taking part in a panel discussion in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, Feb. 21, titled, “Behind the Bumper Sticker: Risk-Sharing.” This event, which runs from noon to 1:30 p.m. eastern time, will be held in the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center and is designed to spur a conversation about risk-sharing proposals in anticipation of a Higher Education Act reauthorization. Hillman explains that “risk sharing,” in this context, is describing when students default on their student loan debt. Students’ credit scores are downgraded, they lose eligibility from other financial aid and they could even face wage garnishment. The colleges where these students obtained this debt have far fewer consequences when borrowers default. Because of this, Sen. Lamar Alexander has advocated for a “risk sharing” policy designed to penalize colleges with poor student loan repayment outcomes.
Mon
Feb
19
A 2005 article from UW-Madison's Michael Apple, "Doing Things the 'Right' Way," was selected as a "Hall of Fame" article by the journal Educational Review. Educational Review's Hall of Fame page selects published articles that "have proved very popular, are highly cited, or have generated considerable debate among readers." In "Doing Things the 'Right' Way," Apple discusses how the "political right" has traditionally blamed educators for “high drop-out rates, a decline in ‘functional literacy’, a loss of standards and discipline, the failure to teach ‘real knowledge’ and economically useful skills, poor scores on standardized tests, and more."
Mon
Feb
19
UW-Madison alumna Hyejung Kim will be receiving the 2018 Outstanding Student Research Award from the American Educational Research Association's special education special interest group (SIG). Kim earned her Ph.D. in special education from the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education in 2017. She is currently working as an adjunct faculty member at New York University in the Embedded Master of Arts in Teaching program. This award is for Kim’s in-preparation paper titled, “Intersectionality of Ableism, Racism, and Linguicism: College Enrollment Process among Korean American Students with Autism.”
Fri
Feb
16
Think of the world as one big classroom. That is the concept behind Siftr, an online citizen-science platform created in 2015 by David Gagnon, director of Field Day Lab at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, to help promote fieldwork in schools. Siftr encourages people to learn more about the world by actually observing it, documenting discoveries through photographs and sharing their projects online at Siftr.org.
Fri
Feb
16
UW-Madison’s Lena Batt was nominated by the university and selected to participate in the 2018 David L. Clark Seminar, a two-day event for emerging educational administration and policy scholars. The seminar is sponsored by the American Educational Research Association’s (AERA) Divisions A and L, and University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA). Batt is a Ph.D. candidate with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies, where she also earned her master’s degree.
Tue
Feb
13
Grand Challenges teams will showcase their Transform proposals submitted for funding on Wednesday, Feb. 28 from 12:30 to 2 p.m. Attendees to the poster fair can come speak with Grand Challenges teams about their proposals, see posters created by ​students from the School of Education's Art Department and have a complimentary lunch. The School of Education's Grand Challenges initiative aims to connect the School of Education with community partners to "identity and address critical problems in education, health and the arts."
Mon
Feb
12
The Madison Museum of Contemporary Art is presenting a solo exhibition by UW-Madison's José Carlos Teixeira through May 20 in the Imprint Gallery. Teixeira is a faculty member with the School of Education's Art Department. In the exhibit, Teixeira explores themes of the complexities of immigration, belonging and exile. Titled "José Carlos Teixeira: ON EXILE," the work is a two-part exhibition featuring video essays.
Tue
Feb
06
At the "Arts Agôn: February Arts Research Forum," arts researchers will share their work with each other and UW-Madison campus colleagues. The Feb. 15 forum aims to create connections and encourage dialogue. The event will feature a Community Arts Collaboratory presentation with Erica Halverson, Kate Corby, Faisal Abdu’Allah and Stephanie Richards. These faculty and staff are partnering in the Arts Collaboratory to develop evaluation tools that can measure and ​demonstrate the impact of their various arts-based education programs.
Wed
Jan
31
UW-Madison’s Jill Barnes will be delivering a presentation at the fourth annual Healthy Hearts for Women Symposium hosted by the University of Kentucky Medical Center. Barnes will be giving a talk on Friday, Feb. 2, titled, “Sex-specific factors regulating pressure and flow.” This symposium is part of the “Go Red for Women” event that's designed to bring attention to cardiovascular disease risk in women. Barnes is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology, where she heads the Barnes Lab within the Bruno Balke Biodynamics Laboratory.
Fri
Jan
26
UW-Madison’s David Kaplan will be receiving the 2018 Samuel J. Messick Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from Division 5 of the American Psychological Association. This recognition honors an individual who has a long and distinguished history of scientific contributions within the field of quantitative research methods. Kaplan is the Patricia Busk Professor of Quantitative Methods with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology.