Research News

Fri
Mar
10
Leonel Lim and UW-Madison’s Michael W. Apple are the editors of a recently released book titled, “The Strong State and Curriculum Reform: Assessing the politics and possibilities of educational change in Asia.” Says Apple: “Too often we talk about borrowing supposedly successful curriculum reform from places such as Singapore, China, Japan or South Korea in a vacuum. This book demands that we look much more closely at the realities of government power and control."
Fri
Mar
10
UW-Madison's Matthew Hora recently published an article in the February issue of the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) journal. Hora is a researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, which is housed within the School of Education. Hora is also an assistant professor of adult teaching and learning with the Department of Liberal Arts and Applied Studies. The article is headlined, "Beyond the Skills Gap," and explores many of the themes in Hora's recently published book of the same name.
Thu
Mar
09
UW-Madison’s Bailey Smolarek will be receiving the 2017 Outstanding Dissertation Award from the American Educational Research Association's (AERA) Critical Educators for Social Justice Special Interest Group. Smolarek is an alumna of the School of Education, having earned her Ph.D. from the No. 1-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction in May. Smolarek’s dissertation is titled, “ ‘Unintended Consequences ‘: Reforms, Race, and the Schooling Experiences of Mexican Emergent Bilinguals in a New Destination High School.”
Thu
Mar
09
Alumna Bethany Wilinski is publishing a book based in her dissertation research while at UW-Madison. Wilinski received a Ph.D. in 2014 from the School of Education's departments of Curriculum and Instruction, and Educational Policy Studies. Today, she is an assistant professor with Michigan State University's Department of Teacher Education. The book is titled: "When Pre-K Comes to School: Policy, Partnerships, and the Early Childhood Education Workforce," and will be released March 10.
Wed
Mar
08
A National Academies of Sciences (NAS) committee whose members include Janet Branchaw and Eric Grodsky, both on faculty at the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Education and principal investigators at its Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), recently released a study examining evidence on undergraduate research experiences. Branchaw and Grodsky are among 16 experts from across the country who were invited to join the committee in 2015.
Wed
Mar
08
UW-Madison alumna Ligia (Licho) López López will be receiving a Recognition Award for her dissertation work from Division B (Curriculum Studies) of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). López López earned her Ph.D. from the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and her adviser was Professor Thomas Popkewitz. Her dissertation is titled, “Indígena: A history of curriculum, teacher education, and the making of human kinds.”
Fri
Mar
03
UW-Madison alumnus Leonard Taylor is being honored with the 2017 Dissertation of the Year Award from the American Association of Blacks in Higher Education (AABHE). Taylor received his master's degree from the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and is now an assistant professor in the educational leadership department at Mississippi State University. A Mississippi State press release says Taylor's research explores how higher education administrators, faculty and staff members can enhance student success and improve the "quality, quantity and diversity" of U.S. graduates by using data and other promising practices.
Wed
Mar
01
UW-Madison’s Brett Nachman authored a chapter in a newly released book that’s titled, “Structural Challenges and the Future of Honors Education.” Nachman’s chapter is called, “Bridging the Academic Gap,” and it examines community college honors students embarking on transfer to four-year institutions with honors programs, and what institutional partnerships among honors programs may look like. Nachman is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.
Mon
Feb
27
This latest work from UW-Madison's Catherine Compton-Lilly examines issues of schooling and how students and their parents make sense of educational experiences over the course of many years. The book follows a group of about 10 students from first grade through high school, bringing to the forefront issues and insights that are invisible in shorter-term projects.
Mon
Feb
27
UW-Madison's Ellie Bruecker is a co-author of a new report from the Association of Community College Trustees that examines the role of financial aid in supporting students. Bruecker is a doctoral candidate with the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. The report is titled, "Aiding Success: The Role of Federal and State Financial Aid in Supporting California Community College Students."
Fri
Feb
24
UW-Madison’s Xueli Wang and her research team authored an intriguing new report that appears in the most recent edition of the journal Frontiers in Psychology. The article is headlined "A Nuanced Look at Women in STEM Fields at Two-Year Colleges: Factors That Shape Female Students' Transfer Intent." The report examines women's intent to transfer to a four-year program after starting STEM programs or courses at two-year colleges. Co-authors on the paper include Hsun-yu Chan, Sara Jimenez Soffa and Brett Ranon Nachman, a doctoral student with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.
Mon
Feb
20
UW-Madison’s Lesley Bartlett will be delivering a presentation about her new book Feb. 23 at Columbia University. The book is titled “Rethinking Case Study Research: A Comparative Approach" and is co-authored by UW-Madison alumna Frances Vavrus. A flyer promoting the talk at Columbia University explains how Bartlett “contends that new approaches are necessitated by conceptual shifts in the social sciences, specifically in relation to culture, context, space, place, and comparison itself.”
Mon
Feb
13
UW-Madison’s Haley Vlach is receiving an Early Career Research Contribution Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). This prestigious honor is given to emerging scientists in the field of child development, as evidenced through research, publications and other scholarly activity. Vlach is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology and the director of the Learning, Cognition, and Development (LCD) Lab.
Wed
Feb
08
UW-Madison’s Martina Rau recently received a prestigious early CAREER grant from the National Science Foundation to explore how adaptive educational technologies can improve students' learning in STEM fields. Rau will examine how physical models can be integrated with virtual models into adaptive technologies. The NSF award, for $598,399, will support Rau’s work that'll involve students and instructors at both four- and two-year colleges over the next five years.
Tue
Jan
31
UW-Madison's Robert Enright, who has pioneered the study of forgiveness in locations across the globe for three decades, is playing a leading role in assembling the Jerusalem Conference on Forgiveness for Peace, which is scheduled for July 12-13 at the Notre Dame of Jerusalem Center in Israel. Enright’s forgiveness model is based on the premise that letting go of feelings of anger and resentment can be liberating.
Mon
Jan
16
UW-Madison’s Lesley Bartlett and alumna Frances Vavrus are co-authors of a recently released book that examines a new and innovative way to conduct research of policy and practice across multiple social fields. Bartlett is a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. Vavrus earned her Ph.D. from the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction and is now a professor in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota.
Fri
Jan
13
UW-Madison’s David Kaplan and colleagues at the German Institute for International Education Research recently published a new book examining the methodology and research behind the highly publicized Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) global education survey. Kaplan, the Patricia Busk Professor of Quantitative Methods with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology, worked on this project during the 2015-16 academic year while he was visiting Germany as a Humboldt Research Award scholar.
Tue
Jan
10
UW-Madison’s Xueli Wang served as editor of ​a special issue of New Directions for Institutional Research titled, "Studying Transfer in Higher Education: New Approaches to Enduring and Emerging Topics."
Fri
Jan
06
UW-Madison's Edward Hubbard and Department of Educational Psychology colleague Percival Matthews are conducting neuroscience-based research on fractions. What makes them so challenging for people -- and how can we most effectively teach children about fractions? The researchers are trying to answer these questions by finding out which areas of the brain are involved in learning fractions and how current classroom teaching techniques engage these brain regions.
Fri
Dec
30
The Journal of African American Males in Education recently published a paper from UW-Madison’s Mauriell Amechi that explores the college pathways and experiences of four black males who grew up in foster care. Amechi is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. He used in-depth interviews with the four men to examine how “challenging experiences and adverse environmental conditions in the foster care system shaped their self-defined college goals."