Research News

Thu
Sep
15
UW-Madison’s Regina Y. Fuller, a doctoral student with the Department of Educational Policy Studies, has been selected to be part of a new Health Policy Research Scholars program being led by Johns Hopkins University, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. As part of the inaugural cohort of scholars with the program, Fuller plans to build research on how African-born adolescents, in the United States and West Africa, interact with community-based spaces around issues of reproductive health and pregnancy prevention.
Tue
Sep
13
Two projects of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research within UW–Madison’s School of Education are among those selected to receive first-ever National Science Foundation INCLUDES funding. WCER Director Robert Mathieu is the principal investigator on one project and Jerlando Jackson, the university's Vilas Distinguished Professor of Higher Education, is a collaborating investigator on another. These NSF-backed projects are designed to develop bold, new approaches for diversifying the science and engineering workforce of the United States.
Fri
Sep
09
The education research of UW-Madison alumna Maria Lewis is highlighted in a recent news story posted to Penn State University’s website. The article begins: “Maria Lewis is working collaboratively with the Pennsylvania Department of Education’s Office for Safe Schools on issues of how to better accommodate transgender youth within the state’s school districts, issues that Lewis believes can be solved not only through research but by revisiting the purpose of an educator." Lewis is an assistant professor of education in Penn State’s College of Education. She earned her Ph.D. from UW-Madison's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis in 2014.
Tue
Sep
06
UW-Madison’s Martina Rau is the principal investigator on two grants awarded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) this past summer, with funding for the projects topping $1.1 million. Each of these projects will focus on how to help students learn with visual representations. Learning in the sciences often relies on visual features that depict information. Visual representations, for example, could include a pie chart depicting a fraction or a ball-and-stick model portraying chemical molecules. Rau is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology.
Tue
Aug
30
The Wisconsin State Journal recently published a report examining Gov. Scott Walker’s proposal to provide new funding for the University of Wisconsin System in the state's 2017-19 budget based on a series of “performance” measures such as graduation rates and job placement statistics. Among the range of experts the State Journal interviewed for this report is UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman, an associate professor who studies higher education finance and policy with the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.
Mon
Aug
29
In the fast-growing and job-rich disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, improving instruction at the college level is critical to keeping students engaged in these fields. But filling in bubbles on institutionalized end-of-term teacher evaluation questionnaires, a standard practice at many large research universities, often fails to produce timely and meaningful data for improving instruction, according to a new study co-authored by Oregon State University's Bouwma-Gearhart and UW-Madison's Matthew Hora. Bouwma-Gearhart also is an alumna of UW-Madison's School of Education.
Fri
Aug
26
Several alumni of UW-Madison's School of Education recently presented research as part of a group panel at the XVI World Congress of Comparative Education Societies, held Aug. 22-26 in Beijing, China. Each of those presenting from UW-Madison as part of the group panel, “Global Struggles for Critical Democratic Education,” earned doctorates from the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
Mon
Aug
15
Several researchers with ties to UW-Madison’s School of Education have co-authored a new report that takes a closer look at the problem of persistence -– and why programs that are designed to guide promising students from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups into science careers often miss the mark. The report is titled, “New Measures Assessing Predictors of Academic Persistence for Historically Underrepresented Racial/Ethnic Undergraduates in Science,” and it appears in the journal CBE-Life Sciences Education.
Thu
Aug
11
The School of Education's Noah Weeth Feinstein is part of a 12-person committee that produced a report for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine assessing the state of science literacy in the U.S. The study notes that Americans may know more than you think about science. However, when it comes to altering the public’s mindset about complex topics such as climate change, the report says that attitudes may be difficult to change because they are shaped by factors such as values and beliefs -- rather than knowledge of the science alone.
Wed
Aug
03
The School of Education’s Haley Vlach is a co-principal investigator on a project that is receiving backing in the latest round of UW2020: WARF Discovery Initiative funding. The project is titled, “From Simple Words to Complex Ideas: Understanding the Role of Language in Learning.” Vlach is an assistant professor with the No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology.
Mon
Aug
01
UW-Madison’s Xueli Wang is the author of a groundbreaking research article examining community college course-taking patterns that contribute to effective academic pathways for transfer-aspiring students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The article is titled “Course-Taking Patterns of Community College Students Beginning in STEM: Using Data Mining Techniques to Reveal Viable STEM Transfer Pathways.” It will appear in the August issue of Research in Higher Education. Wang is a faculty member with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.
Thu
Jul
28
UW-Madison alumna and Michigan State University Professor Patricia Edwards is the author of a new book titled, “New Ways to Engage Parents: Strategies and Tools for Teachers and Leaders, K-12.” Edwards received her Ph.D. from the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 1979. UW-Madison’s Catherine Compton-Lilly, a faculty member with the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, penned the foreword for Edwards’ book.
Wed
Jul
27
A book co-authored by UW-Madison’s John Diamond was recently named the winner of the 2016 Eduardo Bonilla-Silva Outstanding Book Award by the Racial and Ethnic Minorities Division of the Society for the Study of Social Problems. This award honors the significant theoretical and empirical contributions of Eduardo Bonilla-Silva to the understanding of contemporary race and racism. The publication, “Despite the Best Intentions: How Racial Inequality Thrives in Good Schools,” is co-authored by Amanda Lewis.
Fri
Jul
22
UW-Madison’s Bruce King and Laura Lang recently delivered a presentation at the International Baccalaureate Conference of the Americas, which was held July 14-17 in Toronto. They were joined by Mary Allen and Cathy Moore from the Green Lake School District, which is Wisconsin’s only 4K-12 international baccalaureate (IB) district. Their session was titled, “University-K-12 Partnership: Enhancing IB Unit Plans and Assessments through Collaborative Conversations using Authentic Intellectual Work.”
Fri
Jul
15
Students who make relevant arm movements while learning can improve their knowledge and retention of math, research has shown. Now researchers at UW-Madison and Southern Methodist University, Dallas, have developed a model using geometry proofs that shows potential for wide adoption -- a video game in which students make movements with their arms to learn abstract math concepts. This project is being led by UW-Madison’s Mitchell Nathan and Peter Steiner, and SMU’s Candace Walkington. This research team is also collaborating with SMU Guildhall, SMU's graduate-level academic program focused on digital game development.
Wed
Jul
13
A second group of companies formed with assistance from UW-Madison’s Discovery to Product (D2P) has “graduated” from a program designed to advance innovations based on research on campus. And among the startups receiving this recognition is KIINCE, which produced a stroke rehabilitation device. This company is the brainchild ​of the School of Education’s Kreg Gruben, an associate professor with the Department of Kinesiology.
Tue
Jul
12
A new study from a Wisconsin Center for Education Research team led by Matthew Hora finds that providing more active learning in college and the workplace, and discouraging “purple squirrel” hiring practices, are key to meeting Wisconsin’s workforce and civic needs. The Wisconsin study is discussed in greater detail in “Beyond the Skills Gap,” a book scheduled for release by Harvard Education Press this fall. Looking ahead, Hora wants to expand the study globally by investigating the relationship between classroom teaching and workforce development in East Asia.
Fri
Jul
01
The latest edition of Learning Connections, a news magazine from the UW-Madison School of Education, is now available online. The Summer 2016 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students and alumni, and features a cover story about the Morgridge Center for Public Service, which is celebrating 20 years of bridging campus and community.
Mon
Jun
27
A new article by UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman examining the importance of geography when it comes to opportunities in higher education was recently published by the American Educational Research Journal (AERJ). The report is titled, “Geography of College Opportunity: The Case of Education Deserts.” AERJ is the American Educational Research Association’s flagship journal. Hillman writes that "this study finds that the number of local colleges varies along lines of race and class. ... These can result in education deserts, or places where opportunities richly available for some communities are rare (or even nonexistent) in others.”
Mon
Jun
27
UW-Madison's Jacob Meyer is the lead author of a new paper examining the influence of exercise on depression. The report was published online in the journal Behavior Therapy. Results from this study could encourage those suffering from depression to consider light exercise as a useful symptom self-management tool. Meyer is an alumnus of the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology, where he earned a Ph.D. in 2015. He currently works as a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, and as an Instructor in the Department of Kinesiology.