Research News

Tue
Jan
29
UW-Madison’s Maggie Hawkins is receiving the Leadership Through Research Award from the American Educational Research Association’s (AERA) Second Language Research Special Interest Group (SIG). Hawkins is a professor with the School of Education's No. 1-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction. The reviewers for this award were particularly impressed with Hawkins’ innovative contributions of her scholarship, including her cutting-edge research on issues such as critical theory, social justice language teacher education, transmodalities, community engagement, and young learners.
Mon
Jan
28
UW-Madison’s Brett Nachman is the lead author on a new research paper that explains how community college websites often omit depictions of autism — or may even portray it in a medicalized, negative or dehumanizing light. The article appears in the Community College Journal of Research and Practice, and is titled, “Omission and Othering: Constructing Autism on Community College Websites.” Nachman explains that this work is especially important to him as someone with Asperger’s and who attended community college. The report is co-authored with Kirsten Brown, a research faculty member with Edgewood College’s educational leadership doctoral program.
Sat
Jan
26
The annual UW-Madison Education Research Poster Fair is seeking proposals that spotlight education research across campus. These proposals may address research findings related to pre-k through adult education. The fair, which is co-sponsored by the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning and the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), will take place on Feb. 22 from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery.
Fri
Jan
25
UW-Madison’s Ross Benbow and Matthew Hora co-authored a new research paper examining the cultural nature of skills necessary to be productively employed after college graduation. Their paper, “Reconsidering College Student Employability: A Cultural Analysis of Educator and Employer Conceptions of Workplace Skills,” appeared in the Harvard Educational Review.
Fri
Jan
18
A new study shows refugees who resettle in Wisconsin face a daunting array of barriers, both systemic and situational, in getting college degrees. But creative remedies could be developed, UW−Madison researchers say, to ease their path to higher education and then to better jobs. The report is by Matthew Wolfgram, a senior researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, and assistant director of the Center for Research on College-Workforce Transitions.
Wed
Jan
16
UW-Madison’s Douglas Rosenberg, who edited the 2016 publication, “The Oxford Handbook of Screendance Studies,” is receiving the prestigious 2018 Oscar G. Brockett Book Prize for Dance Research. The prize, from the Dance Studies Association, is awarded to the best book in dance published during the previous three calendar years. Rosenberg, who chairs the School of Education's Art Department, will receive this award in August at the 2019 Dance Studies Association Conference at Northwestern University.
Wed
Jan
16
CIMER, the Center for the Improvement of Mentored Experiences in Research, will be providing research-focused mentoring expertise in a national STEM diversity campaign. CIMER, formed in 2015 and housed in the School of Education's Wisconsin Center for Education Research, is dedicated to improving research-focused mentoring relationships at all career stages in higher education. Research has shown that mentoring improves a mentee’s career satisfaction, productivity and career progression. CIMER is directed by Christine Pfund.
Tue
Jan
15
UW–Madison has chosen three finalists for a national competition seeking ideas to expand and strengthen the middle class in Dane County and beyond, and the School of Education’s Elizabeth Graue is part of a team that’s moving on in the competition. Graue and her colleagues are collaborating on a project titled, “We Care for Dane Kids.” This initiative will utilize a multi-pronged approach to transforming the early childhood and after school care sectors that would supplement income for workers and child care costs, reduce operating expenses for facilities, and create a child care benefit program.
Tue
Jan
15
With 2019 now upon us, Kappan magazine recently took a look back at its most popular stories, as determined by readers, for the previous year. And in 2018, checking in at No. 2 is an Under the Law column from UW-Madison’s Julie Underwood titled, “School uniforms, dress codes, and free expression: What’s the balance?” The deck headline on this popular article, which appeared in the Feb. 26 issue, reads, “Requiring school uniforms may be less legally fraught than implementing a school dress code.” Underwood is the Susan Engeleiter Professor of Education Law, Policy and Practice, and the former dean of the School of Education.
Wed
Jan
09
Gary Orfield and UW-Madison’s Nick Hillman will be delivering a public book talk on Thursday, Jan. 24, to discuss their publication, “Accountability and Opportunity in Higher Education: The Civil Rights Dimension.” Released in March 2018 and co-edited by Orfield and Hillman, the book includes essays from top academics addressing the unforeseen impact of accountability standards on students of color and the institutions that disproportionately serve them. The book talk runs from 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. in the Education Building’s Wisconsin Idea room.
Tue
Jan
08
UW-Madison’s David Kaplan received a federal grant for a new project titled, “Utilizing State NAEP Data for Probabilistic Prediction and Forecasting: A Bayesian Approach.” The grant is from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Research and Development Program. Kaplan's newly funded project concerns the critically important problem of monitoring of trends in education outcomes over time.
Tue
Jan
08
A fourth edition of “Ideology and Curriculum,” written by UW-Madison's Michael Apple, is being released for its 40th anniversary. First published in 1979, this work has informed the relationship of cultural and economic power in education. It has become widely recognized for its ground-breaking statements, celebrated as one of the most significant education books during the 20th century. Apple has updated his renowned book, adding a full chapter as well as a new preface.
Thu
Dec
20
The School of Education’s Virginia Horne Henry Fund for Women’s Physical Education, Movement and the Female Body in Culture is now accepting project proposals and applications for the Distinguished Graduate Fellowships. All UW-Madison faculty, staff and student organizations are welcome to apply. The deadline for proposals is Feb. 1, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.
Tue
Dec
18
UW-Madison's Julie Mead has co-authored a policy brief titled, “How School Privatization Opens the Door for Discrimination,” which analyzes discrimination in an era of education privatization. Mead is the School of Education’s associate dean for education and is a professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. The brief, co-authored with Indiana University's Susan Eckes, was published through the National Education Policy Center (NEPC).
Fri
Dec
14
A professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH) and in the Department of Kinesiology at the UW-Madison School of Education, Farrar Edwards has focused her research on investigating the cultural, physical, genetic and lifestyle factors that lead to a wide range of health conditions that have disparate effects on different populations. Her current investigations have the goal of advancing health equity by addressing health disparities, particularly focusing on Alzheimer’s disease and stroke in African American populations. She has contributed to significant advances in the care of minority, immigrant and tribal communities in Wisconsin, but says there’s a long way to go. This is among the reasons she advocated for UW-Madison to engage in the All of Us Research Program.
Thu
Dec
13
In her most recent column of Under the Law for Phi Delta Kappan magazine, a professional journal for educators, Julie Underwood discusses marginal decisions in the US Supreme Court that changed the direction of education policy and practice. By describing these 5-4 landmark education cases, “each hinged on just one vote,” Underwood hopes to display the significance of every vote and opinion, especially in the Supreme Court.
Tue
Dec
11
The journal Brain Plasticity recently published a new paper from UW-Madison’s Jill Barnes and Adam Corkery titled, “Exercise Improves Vascular Function, but does this Translate to the Brain?” Their research examines how cerebrovascular function facilitates the connection between exercise and cognition, specifically applying this to Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia.
Mon
Dec
10
The latest edition of Learning Connections, a news magazine published twice a year for alumni and friends of the UW-Madison School of Education, is now available online. The ​Fall 2018 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students and alumni. The theme for this latest issue is impact. By tapping into its talents and expertise, the School is involved in a range of initiatives across the arts, health and education that are designed to positively impact our community — and our world.
Fri
Dec
07
UW-Madison’s Matthew Hora and his colleagues Ross Benbow and Bailey Smolarek recently had a report critiquing the idea of soft skills published in Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning. Hora is an assistant professor of adult and higher education in the Department of Liberal Arts and Applied Studies, and is an affiliate with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. Hora is also a research scientist with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), and the director of UW-Madison’s Center for College-Workforce Transitions (CCWT), which is housed within WCER.
Thu
Dec
06
John Baldacchino, the director of UW-Madison’s Division of the Arts and a professor with the School of Education’s ​art education program, will be publishing his new book, “Art as Unlearning: Towards a Mannerist Pedagogy,” on Dec. 13. In this book, Baldacchino pushes past traditional art education aspects.