Research News

Tue
Feb
06
At the "Arts Agôn: February Arts Research Forum," arts researchers will share their work with each other and UW-Madison campus colleagues. The Feb. 15 forum aims to create connections and encourage dialogue. The event will feature a Community Arts Collaboratory presentation with Erica Halverson, Kate Corby, Faisal Abdu’Allah and Stephanie Richards. These faculty and staff are partnering in the Arts Collaboratory to develop evaluation tools that can measure and ​demonstrate the impact of their various arts-based education programs.
Wed
Jan
31
UW-Madison’s Jill Barnes will be delivering a presentation at the fourth annual Healthy Hearts for Women Symposium hosted by the University of Kentucky Medical Center. Barnes will be giving a talk on Friday, Feb. 2, titled, “Sex-specific factors regulating pressure and flow.” This symposium is part of the “Go Red for Women” event that's designed to bring attention to cardiovascular disease risk in women. Barnes is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology, where she heads the Barnes Lab within the Bruno Balke Biodynamics Laboratory.
Fri
Jan
26
UW-Madison’s David Kaplan will be receiving the 2018 Samuel J. Messick Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from Division 5 of the American Psychological Association. This recognition honors an individual who has a long and distinguished history of scientific contributions within the field of quantitative research methods. Kaplan is the Patricia Busk Professor of Quantitative Methods with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology.
Thu
Jan
25
A recent publication from UW-Madison’s Matthew Hora is being honored by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) with its 2018 Frederic W. Ness Book Award, which is given to the work that best contributes to the understanding and improvement of liberal education. Hora is being recognized for “Beyond the Skills Gap: Preparing College Students for Life and Work.” Hora wrote the book with Ross J. Benbow, an associate researcher with WCER, and Amanda K. Oleson, an education scholar focused on workforce pathways.
Mon
Jan
22
UW-Madison's Beth Graue and Erica Ramberg reviewed and responded to a report about the advantages of online degree programs titled, “When Degree Programs for Pre-K Teachers Go Online: Challenges and Opportunities.” The report, written by Shayna Cook and published by the New America Foundation, argues that appropriately structured online degree programs have the potential to professionalize and increase the quality of early childhood (EC) teachers. Graue and Ramberg assert the report underplays a number of critical issues in professionalizing the field.
Wed
Jan
17
UW-Madison’s Daniel Bolt was recently elected as the president of the Psychometric Society in a vote by the organization’s membership. He will begin serving on the executive committee as president-elect in August, and will serve as president of the organization in 2019-20. Bolt is a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Psychology. The Psychometric Society is a professional organization founded in 1935 with the goal of advancing quantitative methodology in the behavioral sciences. It includes more than 600 members from 36 countries representing a range of academic disciplines, as well as industry and government agencies.
Tue
Jan
16
UW-Madison’s Center for College-Workforce Transitions (CCWT) was recently awarded $25,000 by the University of Wisconsin System to conduct a study of internship programs at UW-Parkside. CCWT is ​led by Matt Hora and housed within the School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research. While internships and other forms of work-based learning are being increasingly promoted throughout the world as a way to improve the employability of college students and address workplace needs, relatively little robust empirical research exists on the relationship between internship programs and student success.
Thu
Jan
11
UW-Madison’s Elizabeth Toomarian and Edward Hubbard co-authored a research article that was published earlier this month by the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. Toomarian is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Psychology, where Hubbard is an assistant professor. Their research offers new insights into how adults process fractions. This information could one day help children more easily understand fractions, which is a key to establishing a solid foundation in mathematics.
Wed
Jan
10
UW-Madison’s Kathryn Moeller recently was named to the editorial board of the interdisciplinary journal, Feminist Studies. Moeller is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. In her new role with the journal, she will be leading the review of articles related to education in a call for papers on “Indigenous Feminist Politics in Settler Contexts.”
Wed
Jan
10
The work of UW-Madison’s Simon Goldberg was recently featured by the University of California, Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center in its annual list of the "Top 10 Insights from the Science of a Meaningful Life in 2017." The results from Goldberg’s paper, "Mindfulness-based interventions for psychiatric disorders," stood out among the hundreds of studies that were on this center’s radar. Goldberg's paper was a major research review of 142 non-overlapping studies that found mindfulness-based interventions hold promise as evidence-based treatments for psychiatric disorders, but not for everyone or for every condition. Goldberg recently completed his Ph.D. with UW-Madison’s Department of Counseling Psychology and will be joining that department as an assistant professor in August.
Fri
Jan
05
The School of Education’s Kristen Pickett is receiving a career development award for a proposed study titled, “Examining the effects of social engagement on exercise outcomes: In-home cycling for individuals with Parkinson disease.” Pickett, who is an assistant professor with the Department of Kinesiology’s Occupational Therapy program, is receiving the award from UW-Madison’s Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR). The overall aim of ICTR Career Development awards is to develop a diverse and multidisciplinary clinical and translational research workforce.
Thu
Dec
28
A new report from a research-practice partnership between the UW–Madison School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research and the Madison Metropolitan School District finds that, overall, students who enrolled in MMSD 4K experienced slightly stronger literacy skills and slightly higher teacher ratings of engaging in consistently high classroom effort in kindergarten. The Madison Education Partnership researchers note that MMSD’s 4K students of color, as well as those from families with lower incomes and those whose parents ended their formal education at high school, show significantly stronger literacy skills at the beginning of five-year-old kindergarten than similar students who did not enroll in 4K.
Wed
Dec
27
Inside Higher Ed recently reported on two new academic research papers that are identifying some negative consequences linked to performance-based funding formulas being used in different places across the United States. And one of the new papers noted is from UW-Madison’s Nick Hillman, who has published several reports on this topic and is an associate professor with the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.
Thu
Dec
14
The latest edition of Learning Connections, the School of Education’s alumni magazine, is now posted online. In the Fall 2017 issue we hope to pique your curiosity and deepen your appreciation of the School by spotlighting a sampling of the many ways in which faculty, staff and students are developing creative programs, conducting leading-edge research and advancing innovative tools — all of which can help us better address the many challenges of the modern world.
Tue
Dec
12
The 2018 UW-Madison Education Research Poster Fair will be held on Friday, Feb. 23, in the Town Center at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery. For the last three years, this event hosted by the Wisconsin Center for Education Research has seen ever increasing participation in both the number of posters and the number of attendees. Those interested can submit a new or existing poster about research findings related to pre-K through adult education To present a poster, register by Friday, Feb. 9.
Wed
Dec
06
Members of UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Equity and Inclusion Laboratory (Wei LAB) traveled to Boulder, Colo., in November for a workshop related to the Geoscience Diversity Experiential Simulations (GeoDES) Project, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The three-day workshop, held Nov. 13-15, helped participants think critically about race, gender and sexual identity, as well as develop leadership techniques and skills. The workshop included bystander intervention training through the use of virtual reality technology.
Wed
Dec
06
UW-Madison's Julie Underwood authored another "Under the Law" column for Phi Delta Kappan magazine, with her latest report examining teachers' classroom speech and the legal rights of school boards in determining what materials are appropriate for the classroom.
Tue
Dec
05
UW-Madison’s Jill Barnes is the lead author of a recently published paper in the American Heart Association's Hypertension journal. The research examines an association between pregnancy history and brain blood flow characteristics. The results suggest a history of high blood pressure (specifically preeclampsia) negatively affects cerebral circulation years after pregnancy. This might explain the greater risk of stroke and cognitive decline in women who have had a history of preeclampsia.
Mon
Dec
04
An innovative and groundbreaking 2012 book co-authored by UW-Madison’s Clifton Conrad and Laura Dunek was recently translated into Chinese and published by Shanghai Scientific and Technological Education Publishing House. The book, which was initially published in English by the Johns Hopkins University Press, is titled, “Cultivating Inquiry-Driven Learners: A College Education for the 21st Century.”
Wed
Nov
29
The research of UW-Madison’s Kathryn Kirchgasler that examines the racialized history of U.S. science education was recently featured in a news report from the University of Kansas. Kirchgasler is a Ph.D. candidate with the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction. While completing her dissertation, Kirchgasler has started working as a lecturer with the University of Kansas’ Department of Curriculum and Teaching. The news report notes how Kirchgasler has been studying how U.S. students have been separated into different levels of science classes for more than a century and how research and standardized testing have perpetuated inequalities.