Research News

Wed
Jun
22
Education Week recently published a report headlined, “The ‘Maker’ Movement Is Coming to K-12: Can Schools Get It Right?” UW-Madison’s Erica Halverson is among the range of experts -- from a number of fields -- interviewed for this in-depth report. The associate professor with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction tells Education Week, "The fear out there is that schools have to choose between making and academic work, but empirically that turns out not to be true."
Wed
Jun
15
UW-Madison's Tim McGuine agrees that concussions are an important topic. But this alumnus of the Athletic Training Program adds, "concussions are sucking up all the air in the room when it comes to discussions about sports injuries -– and we need to think about the well-being of the entire student-athlete.” It’s this perspective of identifying and understanding the range of risk factors, preventative measures and outcomes for sports injuries that McGuine brings to his work with UW-Madison’s Athletic Training Program, which is housed within the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology.
Wed
Jun
08
The Atlantic on June 6 published a short article headlined, “The Professional Burdens of Being a ‘Model Minority.’ ” The report by Adia Harvey Wingfield examines how “stereotypes about Asian Americans are often held up as proof that racial labels can be flattering, but they subtly produce a number of problems in schools and offices.” And among the resources The Atlantic uses in its efforts to put this topic in perspective is research conducted by UW-Madison’s Stacey Lee, a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies.
Tue
May
31
UW-Madison's Aydin Bal is the lead author of an article that was recently published in the journal Review of Educational Research (RER). The article is titled, “Culturally Responsive Experimental Intervention Studies: The Development of a Rubric for Paradigm Expansion.” Bal explains that the article presents a rubric for culturally responsive experimental intervention studies and its underlying theoretical framework. The rubric operationalizes cultural responsiveness in the context of experimental intervention research.
Sat
May
28
The latest edition of “The disAbility Advocate,” the annual alumni newsletter for UW-Madison’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, is now available online. The department is housed within the School of Education.
Fri
May
27
A new article by UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman is critical of policies that link state funding of public higher education to certain performance measures. The report, released by The Century Foundation earlier this week, is titled “Why Performance-Based College Funding Doesn’t Work.” More than two-thirds of states are either developing or using some sort of performance-based funding for public colleges and universities, with performance being tracked in areas such as graduation rates and degree production numbers. But Hillman argues this way of distributing funding is rarely effective.
Thu
May
26
Many veterans of the Gulf War, which took place from 1990-91, suffer from a complex and chronic illness that can cause pain, fatigue and cognitive problems. UW-Madison’s Dane Cook is in the midst of a four-year project searching for answers to Gulf War Illness (GWI) thanks to a grant he received from the Department of Veterans Affairs. To learn about this project, check out a new report from Eric Rajala, MERIT’s video producer.
Thu
May
19
Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) doctoral students who participate in teaching-development activities during graduate school are more likely to use effective instructional methods once they begin teaching --- and also may increase their prospects for being hired into college faculty positions -- according to a recent study funded by the National Science Foundation. The seven-year study found that participation in teaching-development programs during doctoral studies can have a long-term impact on STEM teaching practices across the nation.
Tue
May
17
Video from Rachelle Winkle-Wagner’s recent talk, “Affirmative Action Under Fire: Discourse on the Texas Top Ten Percent Plan,” organized by the Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education (WISCAPE), is now available on the WISCAPE YouTube channel.
Thu
May
12
Projects both large and small will help UW-Madison contribute knowledge and resources across the state, thanks to grants from the Ira and Ineva Reilly Baldwin Wisconsin Idea Endowment. This year, nine grants of up to $120,000 were awarded as well as 11 mini-grants of up to $4,000 to encourage innovation and experimentation in small-scale projects. Among those receiving funding are: Carmen Valdez, an associate professor with the Department of Counseling Psychology; Michael Dando, a graduate student with the Department of Curriculum and Instruction; and David Gagnon, an alumnus of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
Tue
May
03
UW-Madison’s Dr. M. Alison Brooks, along with co-investigator David Bell, is receiving a grant for her research titled, “Parent-Athlete Knowledge of Sport Volume Recommendations, Attitudes and Beliefs towards Sport Specialization.” The grant, awarded by the foundations for the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and the American College of Sports Medicine, is for $20,000. Bell is an assistant professor with the Department of Kinesiology’s Athletic Training Program and the director of the Wisconsin Injury in Sport Laboratory (WISL).
Fri
Apr
29
Bianca Baldridge, an assistant professor with UW-Madison’s Department of Educational Policy Studies, is the recipient of a prestigious National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship. The award, which was announced Friday, April 29, will allow Baldridge to undertake a research project during the 2016-17 academic year titled, “Exploring Race and Educational Opportunity within Community-based Educational Spaces.”
Thu
Apr
28
UW-Madison’s Laura Minero has been selected as an awardee in the Ford Foundation's 2016 Predoctoral Fellowship Competition. This award provides financial support for three years and the opportunity to participate in the Conference of Ford Fellows. Minero, a second-year Ph.D. student with the Department of Counseling Psychology, plans to use this funding to develop a mixed-method study that assesses the role and influence of U.S. detention centers on undocumented transgender individuals’ mental health and wellness.
Wed
Apr
27
UW-Madison’s Aydin Bal is the co-editor of a recently published book titled, "Learning from Difference: Comparative Accounts of Multicultural Education." According to the book’s abstract, this publication analyzes "the experiences of multicultural education in nine very different international settings, uncovering insights from a vast variety of educational contexts." Bal is an assistant professor with the School of Education's Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, and a researcher at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research. It also is edited by Joseph Lo Bianco.
Tue
Apr
26
UW-Madison’s Mitchell Nathan and Martha Alibali presented at a conference in Washington, D.C., earlier this month titled, “Bringing Cognitive Science Research to the Classroom.” The conference hosted a number of prominent scholars, practitioners, and educational policy scholars to address ways to connect cognitive science research and mathematics educational practices and curriculum design. Nathan is the director of the Center on Education and Work and is a professor of the learning sciences with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked departments ofEducational Psychology and Curriculum and Instruction.
Tue
Apr
26
The work of UW-Madison’s Nick Hillman was recently highlighted in an article published in the Edwardsville (Ill.) Intelligencer headlined, “Location means a lot for college enrollments.” The article looks at a study recently co-authored by Hillman titled, “Education Deserts: The Continued Significance of ‘Place’ in the Twenty-First Century.” Hillman is an associate professor with the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. He also is an affiliate of the Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education (WISCAPE).
Fri
Apr
22
When science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) doctoral students participate in teaching development programs, their skills, confidence and interest in teaching undergraduates increase, according to a just-completed study funded by the National Science Foundation.
Thu
Apr
21
UW-Madison’s Elizabeth Larson helped secure a grant for Madison's Elvehjem Elementary School titled, “Active Classroom Engagement (ACE).” This project ­–- which is being supported by a $25,000 grant from the Foundation for Madison’s Public Schools -– is designed to create movement-permissive classrooms to accommodate students’ natural need to be more active.
Mon
Apr
18
UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman recently co-authored a blog post for the Brookings Institution's website titled, “Where you live rather than what you know? The problem with education deserts." The post, for Brookings' The Brown Center Chalkboard blog, explores how geography affects educational equity and opportunity.
Sat
Apr
16
A book co-authored by UW-Madison’s Clifton Conrad was translated into Chinese and re-published by the Peking University Press. The book, originally published in 1993, is titled, “A Silent Success: Master's Education in the United States.” Conrad is a Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor and a faculty member in the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. He is also an affiliate of the Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education (WISCAPE).