School of Education News

Mon
Apr
15
UW-Madison’s Walter Stern published an op-ed with the New Orleans Advocate newspaper earlier this month, making the case for New Orleans to compensate African-Americans for past discrimination. Stern is a historian of education and an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. He is the author of a 2018 book titled, “Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City, 1764-1960.” Stern remarks that “a key consequence of segregation, like slavery before it, was the redistribution of capital from black to white hands.” He calls for action from the city after 300 years of a persisting wealth gap between black and white New Orleanians.
Fri
Apr
12
UW–Madison's Chloe Darke, a master of fine arts student with the School of Education’s Art Department, was recently featured on the PBS TV series, “Craft in America.” Darke practices silversmithing, a craft that is generations old. She is fascinated by traditional ways of making things, and finds that there is a reemergence of a love for the craft.
Fri
Apr
12
The podcast Fresh Ed recently started an education and law mini-series, the first episode of which includes an interview with UW-Madison’s Julie Mead. Mead is the School of Education’s associate dean for education, and a professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. On this episode, they discuss Mead’s recent report, co-written with Suzanne Eckes, titled “How School Privatization Opens the Door for Discrimination.” They touch on issues related to voucher programs and charter schools.
Thu
Apr
11
A book authored by UW–Madison's Walter Stern received the 2018 Kemper and Leila Williams Prize in Louisiana History. Stern is a historian of education who is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. His award-winning book is titled, “Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City, 1764-1960.”
Thu
Apr
11
The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism recently published a story on civics education featuring the expertise of UW-Madison’s Diana Hess. Hess serves as the dean of the School of Education and holds the Karen A. Falk Distinguished Chair of Education. Hess, who used to teach social studies at the high school level, remarks that it was difficult to include civics education into her history curriculum. Unlike many other states, Wisconsin does not require a dedicated civics course.
Wed
Apr
10
More than 300 high school art students are expected to be on the UW–Madison campus Friday, April 12, for the Visual Arts Classic. This state-wide art competition runs from 8 a.m. to 4:15 p.m., and is being sponsored by the Wisconsin Art Education Association and the UW-Madison Art Department, which is housed within the School of Education.
Wed
Apr
10
UW-Madison's Office of Child Care and Family Resources (OCCFR) is hosting its 22nd annual Jazzin’ fundraiser on Wednesday, April 17. This year’s event runs from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Gordon Dining and Event Center, and includes a silent auction, raffle, hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, and live jazz music from talented vocalist Lynette Margulies and her quartet.
Wed
Apr
10
Education Dive recently published an article on school resource officer (SRO) training, which features the expertise of Katie Eklund. According to Education Dive, demand for school resource officers in on the rise — and so is the demand that SROs participate in social-emotional learning (SEL) training. Eklund is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Psychology and the co-director of the Madison Education Partnership.
Wed
Apr
10
UW-Madison's Francois Tochon has earned another major international honor, this time receiving an honorary professorship from Sochoow University in Suzhou, China. Tochon is a professor with the highly-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and an expert in international studies in curriculum, pedagogy and teacher education, world language education, bilingual education, and research methods. He was awarded an Honorary Professorship in Foreign Studies by Sochoow University on March 28.
Tue
Apr
09
UW-Madison’s Carl Grant, John Diamond, and Jordan Conwell will be a part of a panel on April 24, hosted by the Network’s Tony Chambers, discussing Grant’s book, “Du Bois and Education.” Grant, the Hoefs-Bascom Professor of Education with the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, recently published “Du Bois and Education,” which details the life and works of W. E. B. Du Bois related to his views on society, politics, race, and education.
Tue
Apr
09
The American Rehabilitation Counseling Association (ARCA) recently announced its annual Research Awards, and teams associated with UW-Madison authored papers receiving first-, second-, and third-place recognition. This marks the fifth straight year in which researchers associated with UW–Madison have earned top honors in the ARCA Research Awards competition — with an RPSE alumnus being the lead author each time.
Mon
Apr
08
UW–Madison alumnus and Professor Emeritus Truman Lowe (Wakajah), an internationally acclaimed artist whose works are deeply rooted in his Ho-Chunk heritage, died at his home on March 30. He was 75. A memorial service celebrating Lowe’s life is scheduled for Sunday, May 5, at 1:30 p.m. at the Pyle Center, 702 Langdon St.
Fri
Apr
05
School of Education alumni and sisters Judith Mayer and Gillin Nevers have co-founded a press, Fuller’s Windy Acres Farm Press. Named after their grandfather’s farm, who also attended UW-Madison, the press is dedicated to publishing illustrated limited edition books.
Thu
Apr
04
School districts across Wisconsin can get expert help making sure their academic and career planning for students is working well using a new set of tools developed by evaluation professionals at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) in UW-Madison’s School of Education. The free guidance, now live online at a state Department of Public Instruction website, is aimed at helping district and building leaders systematically assess the effectiveness of their ACP plans, which are required to be in place for every student in grades 6-12 under a state law that took effect in fall 2017.
Wed
Apr
03
Abby Harrison, a UW–Madison junior, took one education policy class and knew, “This is what I want to do.” At UW–Madison, she discovered her dream major — a bachelor of science in education studies. “I was really passionate about education but knew I didn’t want to teach," says Harrison. "The education studies degree through the School of Education had everything I wanted.” And the Badger Promise program, which promises free tuition to qualifying first-generation Wisconsin transfer students, helped make it all possible.
Tue
Apr
02
UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman will be delivering testimony to the House Education & Labor Committee’s subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Investment on Wednesday, April 8, in Washington, D.C. This meeting, which begins at 8 a.m. CDT, is the second of five hearings related to the reauthorizing of the Higher Education Act. Hillman is an associate professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and director of the university’s Student Success Through Applied Research (SSTAR) Lab.
Tue
Apr
02
A recent ScienceNews report — headlined “Robots are becoming classroom tutors, But will they make the grade?”— features the work of UW-Madison’s Joseph Michaelis, a doctoral student with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Psychology.
Mon
Apr
01
The American Educational Research Association (AERA) announced the winners of its 2019 awards for excellence in education research on March 29 and UW–Madison’s Aydin Bal is receiving the Scholars of Color Early Career Contribution Award. Bal’s current research projects aim at developing culturally responsive research methodologies and intervention models. In particular, he has developed the Culturally Responsive Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (CRPBIS) framework and Learning Lab methodology, an equity-oriented systemic transformation model that he is helping implement in schools internationally.
Mon
Apr
01
The Department of Kinesiology’s adapted fitness and personal training program is hosting an open house on Thursday, April 11. The open house will highlight the outstanding work being done in the realm of adapted fitness on the UW-Madison campus, and will feature three keynote speakers.
Fri
Mar
29
UW-Madison is launching a new undergraduate certificate program for students looking to gain the specialized knowledge and skills necessary to promote and develop physical activities for individuals with disabilities. The promoting activity for diverse abilities certificate program was approved by the university’s Academic Planning Council and requires 16 to 18 credits for completion. The program is being run through the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology and students can declare for this certificate in the coming fall semester.

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