Research News

Wed
Aug
16
UW-Madison’s Rachelle Winkle-Wagner co-authored a recent paper that was published in the July issue of the Journal of College Student Development. The paper is titled, “Encouraged or Weeded Out: Perspectives of Students of Color in the STEM Disciplines on Faculty Interactions.” In particular, the study examines the different experiences of students of color pursuing STEM degrees at historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) versus predominantly white institutions (PWI). As the paper explains: "The findings suggest that students at PWIs felt as if faculty attempted to 'weed them out' of STEM disciplines, whereas students at HBCUs reported feeling encouraged and well socialized to enter STEM disciplines. There are important lessons from this data on how to better support Students of Color in STEM disciplines."
Tue
Aug
08
UW-Madison’s Tyler Hook recently authored a report that examines the Partnership Schools for Liberia pilot project. Hook is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. The report is titled, “Partnership Schools for Liberia: a critical review,” and it includes revisions by Nancy Kendall, an associate professor with the Department of Educational Policy Studies.
Mon
Aug
07
UW-Madison’s Carmen Valdez was recently awarded two new grants to support the expansion, implementation and further evaluation of the Fortalezas Familiares initiative. Fortalezas Familiares, or Family Strengths, was first piloted by Valdez and her team in 2010 and today is a 14-week, multi-family intervention for Latina immigrant mothers with depression, other family caregivers and their children. This latest round of funding will enable Valdez and her team to conduct a pilot trial of the program with Latino families in Madison and Milwaukee schools.
Fri
Aug
04
UW-Madison’s Kelli Koltyn is leading a team of researchers that recently received funding from the National Institutes of Health to conduct a study titled “Translating a ‘Stand Up and Move More’ Intervention by State Aging Units to Older Adults in Underserved Communities.” “The Stand Up and Move More” intervention consists of four weekly sessions, plus a refresher session at eight weeks. It will be delivered by community partners in Dane, Iowa, Rock and Vilas counties in Wisconsin.
Wed
Aug
02
UW-Madison alumna Erin Ruzicka Trondson earlier this year tied for first place for the 2017 Outstanding Thesis Award given annually by the American Montessori Society (AMS). Trondson completed her master’s degree and research with the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Her Master's thesis is titled: “Montessori Education & Social Justice: Overlap, Potential, & Areas for Growth.”
Mon
Jul
31
A team of researchers from UW-Madison authored a new study that adds to the evidence that specializing in one sport may increase the risk of a range of injuries for high school athletes. The study is titled, “A Prospective Study on the Effect of Sport Specialization on Lower Extremity Injury Rates in High School Athletes,” and it appears in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. Timothy McGuine, who earned his master’s degree from the Department of Kinesiology in 1986 and today is a senior scientist and the research coordinator for the UW Health Sports Medicine Center, is the lead author on a paper. Co-authors include: Eric Post and Stephanie Trigsted, Ph.D. students with the Department of Kinesiology; and David Bell, an assistant professor with the department.
Thu
Jul
20
UW-Madison's Alex Allweiss has been awarded the American Association of University Women’s (AAUW) American Dissertation Fellowship for the 2017-18 academic year. Allweiss is a Ph.D. candidate with the School of Education's departments of Educational Policy Studies, and Curriculum and Instruction. Allweiss' dissertation explores the ways current policies and processes such as militarization, privatization and migration influence the lives and educational trajectories of indigenous Chuj Maya youth.
Thu
Jul
13
The UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research’s (ICTR) AHEAD Pilot Program recently awarded four new grants in response to the 2017 request for proposals. And among those receiving an award in this most recent round of funding is the School of Education’s Stephanie Budge, an assistant professor with the Department of Counseling Psychology. Budge’s research project is titled, “Psychotherapy Minority Stress Interventions for Transgender Patients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.”
Mon
Jul
10
People at risk for Alzheimer's disease who do more moderate-intensity physical activity, but not light-intensity physical activity, are more likely to have healthy patterns of glucose metabolism in their brain, according to a new UW-Madison study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. First author Ryan Dougherty is a graduate student studying under the direction of Dane Cook, a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology and a co-author of the study. Ozioma Okonkwo is the senior author.
Thu
Jul
06
UW-Madison’s Bianca Baldridge is the lead author on a new paper that appears in the Review of Research in Education about community-based educational spaces. The paper explains how community-based educational spaces such as after-school programs and community-based youth organizations "have a long history of interrupting patterns of educational inequity and continue to do so under the current educational policy climate." Co-authors on the paper are Nathan Beck, who received a master's degree from the Department of Educational Policy Studies, and Juan Carlos Medina and Marlo A. Reeves, both of whom are current Ph.D. students with the department.
Wed
Jul
05
UW-Madison’s Rachelle Winkle-Wagner and Loyola University Chicago’s Bridget Turner Kelly co-authored a paper for the most recent edition of the Teachers College Record that is headlined, “Finding a Voice in Predominantly White Institutions: A Longitudinal Study of Black Women Faculty Members’ Journeys Toward Tenure.” Winkle-Wagner is an associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and a faculty affiliate of the Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education.
Mon
Jul
03
Each year, the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) presents awards to the most deserving members of the financial aid profession and higher education community. And among those recognized this year is UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman, who received the Robert P. Huff Golden Quill for his contributions to the body of research on student financial aid. Hillman was recognized for his research “focused on the relationship between financial aid and educational opportunity, particularly for underrepresented students. His work on performance-based funding has challenged conclusions among funders and policymakers that the policies are effective."
Mon
Jul
03
UW-Madison’s Andrew Ruis is the author of a newly released book titled, “Eating to Learn, Learning to Eat: The Origins of School Lunch in the United States.” Ruis is a researcher with the Epistemic Games Group housed within the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, which is part of the School of Education. Ruis' book "explores the origins of American school meal initiatives to explain why it was (and, to some extent, has continued to be) so difficult to establish meal programs that satisfy the often competing interests of children, parents, schools, health authorities, politicians, and the food industry."
Fri
Jun
30
UW-Madison’s Stephanie Budge co-authored four papers comprising a “Major Contribution” that was recently recognized by The Counseling Psychologist with an Outstanding Paper Award. Budge and co-authors received this prestigious honor for their research articles examining a range of topics related to transgender individuals and communities. Budge is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology.
Thu
Jun
29
UW-Madison’s David Bell on Tuesday received the 2017 New Investigator Award from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) Research and Education Foundation. Bell was recognized at the NATA Clinical Symposia in Houston. The New Investigator Award, according to the foundation’s website, “recognizes a researcher who is likely to continue to make significant contributions to the body of knowledge in athletic training and health care.” Bell is an assistant professor with the Department of Kinesiology’s Athletic Training Program and the director of the Wisconsin Injury in Sport Laboratory (WISL).
Wed
Jun
28
UW-Madison’s Regina Fuller was recently awarded a prestigious Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship. These fellowships are administered by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine on behalf of the Ford Foundation. Fuller is a doctoral student with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies.
Thu
Jun
22
Extraordinary members of the UW-Madison faculty were honored during this past academic year with awards supported by the estate of professor, senator and regent William F. Vilas (1840-1908). And among the 34 faculty members from across campus being recognized with a Vilas professorship is the School of Education’s Bernadette Baker. Baker, a professor with the No. 1-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction, was one of 11 faculty members to receive a Vilas Faculty Mid-Career Investigator Award. These mid-career honors recognize research and teaching excellence, with the award providing flexible research funding for one year.
Thu
Jun
22
UW-Madison’s Alexandra Carl is one of six students from across the country to be named a 2017 Undergraduate Research Excellence Fellow (UGREF) by the American Physiological Society (APS). Fellowship recipients spend the summer in the laboratory of an established scientist and APS member, with the UGREF program recruiting undergraduate students worldwide. Carl conducts research with UW-Madison’s Jill Barnes, an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology.
Fri
Jun
16
UW-Madison's Christine Pribbenow received a Baldwin Wisconsin Idea grant for the project titled, "Do You Play Fair? Addressing Bias in K-12 Educational Settings." Pribbenow works within the School of Education's Wisconsin Center for Education Research. She was awarded the grant along with Molly Carnes with the School of Medicine and Public Health. This project aims to close disparities between black and white students by lessening implicit bias.
Tue
Jun
13
UW-Madison’s David Williamson Shaffer is the author of a recently released book that puts forth a groundbreaking new science for understanding what people do and why they do it titled, “Quantitative Ethnography.” Shaffer explains that his latest publication is a methods book that gives investigators the tools they need to bridge the gap between quantitative and qualitative research in the age of big data. Shaffer is the Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Learning Sciences with the Department of Educational Psychology, and is director of the Epistemic Games Group in WCER.