Research News

Mon
Oct
16
A team of researchers, including UW-Madison’s Amy Bellmore, has found that not only is an ethnically diverse school good for students’ cultural appreciation, but it may also be good for their grades. The report is titled, “Early Adolescents’ Peer Experiences with Ethnic Diversity in Middle School: Implications for Academic Outcomes,” and it appears in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence. The report found that all students in the study benefited academically from cross-ethnic peer interactions.
Wed
Oct
11
UW-Madison's Ellie Bruecker authored a policy memo analyzing the fiscal effects of Wisconsin's expanded statewide Parental Choice Program, describing how the voucher program impacts school districts across the state. Bruecker is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. Her analysis finds that while the fiscal effects of the program on public school districts are still relatively small, they are likely to grow over time.
Wed
Oct
11
UW-Madison's Jerlando Jackson will give a talk on Wednesday, Oct. 11, at the College of William & Mary as part of the institution's Diversity Lecture Series. The talk is titled, "Diversity Prism Imperative: Advancing Organizational Ownership of Disparities in Higher Education." In the talk, Jackson will discuss his new working concept of Diversity Prism Imperative in relation to the changing landscape of student bodies, faculty and staff at colleges and universities in the United States growing more diverse.
Tue
Oct
10
Governments and higher education institutions are rushing into the internship game, enthusiastically cheerleading the concept. On the surface, work-based learning appears to be beneficial for everyone. Employers get an inexpensive extra hand who could later become a new hire, students acquire valuable, real-world experience while still in school and educators enhance a student’s classroom knowledge with hands-on learning. But Matt Hora says it's time to take a step back and take a closer look at what we start mandating for students.
Fri
Oct
06
UW-Madison's Xueli Wang, Seo Young Lee and Amy Prevost recently published a report included in the Community College Review's special issue titled "Transfer Matters." The special issue focuses on highlighting new research about transfer students and the community college sector. Wang, Lee and Prevost's study is titled, "The Role of Aspirational Experiences and Behaviors in Cultivating Momentum for Transfer Access in STEM: Variations Across Gender and Race."
Tue
Oct
03
In its first report, the Madison Education Partnership takes a close look at the first six years of 4-year-old kindergarten (4K) offered by Madison’s public schools. The researchers find more than two-thirds of the district’s kindergarten students start in 4K, and that 4K classes are more diverse.
Mon
Oct
02
UW-Madison's Nicholas Hillman and Valerie Crespin-Trujillo recently co-authored a paper in the American Educational Research Journal titled "Evaluating the Impact of Performance Funding in Ohio and Tennessee." The paper explores how Tennessee and Ohio have responded to using performance-based funding models that tie appropriations directly to educational outcomes. The research states that the only significant positive effects were that Tennessee community colleges produced more certificates.
Fri
Sep
29
The class of 2030 has just started kindergarten. As four million youngsters across the country begin the first step of education, a new study provides a first-time look at inequalities in school readiness among Wisconsin’s kindergarten students. Researchers from the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), part of UW–Madison’s School of Education, compared the literacy skills of Wisconsin’s kindergarten students and found them “far from equally prepared to learn.” “These findings are consistent with national research,” states Eric Grodsky, the WCER researcher and UW–Madison professor of sociology and educational policy studies who led the study.
Mon
Sep
25
Of 14 applications to the inaugural Grand Challenges Engage initiative, eight finalists are receiving a combined total of $200,000 to carry out the Wisconsin Idea on behalf of the UW-Madison School of Education over the next two years. The Grand Challenges initiative inspires and facilitates interactions among School of Education faculty, staff and community partners. The goal is to build interdisciplinary teams to identify and design innovative solutions for critical social and scholarly problems across Wisconsin and around the world.
Wed
Sep
20
UW-Madison’s Gary Lupyan and Haley Vlach recently received funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to conduct an innovative and interdisciplinary research project that will examine key questions of how early language experience shapes later cognitive and academic outcomes. As part of the grant, the team will develop an app to help parents track their children's language development. Vlach is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology and Lupyan is an associate professor with the Department of Psychology.
Fri
Sep
15
Peli Galiti has been awarded a prestigious Greek Diaspora Fellowship from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation as part of a cross-cultural collaboration between the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and UW-Madison. Galiti is a visiting scholar with UW-Madison's School of Education ​and is conducting research with Robert Enright, a professor with the School of Education's No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology. Through the fellowship, Galiti will implement forgiveness education programs in Greece, hosting workshops about restorative justice and forgiveness education, as well as conducting research about bullying prevention and class collaboration.
Wed
Sep
13
Recent UW-Madison graduate Katie Roling is the inaugural recipient of the Thomas R. Kratochwill School Psychology Dissertation Award to Advanced Evidence-Based Practice. Roling graduated from the School Psychology program, which is housed within the School of Education's Department of Educational Psychology. The award is given to School Psychology students whose dissertations look to improve outcomes for children and youth using evidence-based practices.
Tue
Sep
05
UW-Madison’s Xueli Wang and Amy Prevost are co-authors of a chapter examining contextualized math courses that appears in the summer 2017 issue of the “New Directions for Community Colleges,” a series that covers current trends in the field of community college education. The chapter from Wang and Prevost is titled, “A Researcher–Practitioner Partnership on Remedial Math Contextualization in Career and Technical Education Programs.”
Thu
Aug
31
UW-Madison’s Laura Minero recently received a grant from the Latino Center for Leadership Development (LCLD) to conduct a study titled, “Impact of Detention Proceedings and Solitary Confinement of Latinx UndocuTrans Populations.” Minero is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology. Minero was also selected to be the APAGS Advocacy Coordinator for the North Central region from 2017-19.
Wed
Aug
30
Scholars from across the United States and Europe will be meeting on the UW-Madison campus Aug. 30 to Sept. 2 for a conference titled, “Theory and Data in Curriculum, History and Educational Studies.” The annual event, which rotates between Stanford University, the University of Vienna and UW-Madison, is being hosted this summer by the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
Fri
Aug
25
In an effort to better connect her education research with people outside the realm of academia, UW-Madison’s Martina Rau recently launched a video blog, or vlog, called, “Learning with Visuals.” Rau directs the Learning Representations and Technology Lab on campus, which studies how educational technologies can best support student learning with visuals. She also is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology, and holds an affiliate appointment in the Department of Computer Sciences.
Wed
Aug
16
UW-Madison’s Rachelle Winkle-Wagner co-authored a recent paper that was published in the July issue of the Journal of College Student Development. The paper is titled, “Encouraged or Weeded Out: Perspectives of Students of Color in the STEM Disciplines on Faculty Interactions.” In particular, the study examines the different experiences of students of color pursuing STEM degrees at historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) versus predominantly white institutions (PWI). As the paper explains: "The findings suggest that students at PWIs felt as if faculty attempted to 'weed them out' of STEM disciplines, whereas students at HBCUs reported feeling encouraged and well socialized to enter STEM disciplines. There are important lessons from this data on how to better support Students of Color in STEM disciplines."
Tue
Aug
08
UW-Madison’s Tyler Hook recently authored a report that examines the Partnership Schools for Liberia pilot project. Hook is a Ph.D. student with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. The report is titled, “Partnership Schools for Liberia: a critical review,” and it includes revisions by Nancy Kendall, an associate professor with the Department of Educational Policy Studies.
Mon
Aug
07
UW-Madison’s Carmen Valdez was recently awarded two new grants to support the expansion, implementation and further evaluation of the Fortalezas Familiares initiative. Fortalezas Familiares, or Family Strengths, was first piloted by Valdez and her team in 2010 and today is a 14-week, multi-family intervention for Latina immigrant mothers with depression, other family caregivers and their children. This latest round of funding will enable Valdez and her team to conduct a pilot trial of the program with Latino families in Madison and Milwaukee schools.
Fri
Aug
04
UW-Madison’s Kelli Koltyn is leading a team of researchers that recently received funding from the National Institutes of Health to conduct a study titled “Translating a ‘Stand Up and Move More’ Intervention by State Aging Units to Older Adults in Underserved Communities.” “The Stand Up and Move More” intervention consists of four weekly sessions, plus a refresher session at eight weeks. It will be delivered by community partners in Dane, Iowa, Rock and Vilas counties in Wisconsin.